Daiwa BG 2500 Spinning Reel Independent Review (On-The-Water Performance)

By: Luke Simonds on December 12, 2017
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daiwa bg reel review

In this article, you’ll see an independent review of the Daiwa BG 2500 spinning reel.

Best of all, it’s focused towards on-the-water performance specifically for inshore saltwater anglers.

Because finding a good saltwater reel can be very tough.

It can be frustrating if you don’t know what to look for, and there are just so many options that it can quickly get overwhelming.

Plus, saltwater is tough on reels so we always need to condsider longevity expectations when deciding upon which reel to buy.

Many members have asked about which spinning reel is best for saltwater anglers who predominantly use artificial lures (aka – lots of casting and retrieving).

So I decided to start buying a variety of inshore reels from various manufacturers so that I can test them myself and then share unbiased feedback to our members since we are not affiliated with any reel manufacturers.

Most importantly, this review is on first-hand usage one the water instead of just looking at the specs… specs are great, but the data I care about most is how it feels and performs when actually using it out on the water.

So in this post, I’ll focus on the feel and performance that I’ve personally felt and seen whe using the new Daiwa BG 2500 spinning reel.

Daiwa BG 2500 Spinning Reel Usage

For the past few months, I have been using my new Daiwa BG 2500 reel in a variety of inshore fishing applications.

Most of the fishing I’ve done with it has been targeting redfish, snook, and seatrout up on the flats.

But I’ve also used it for lighter applications such as casting light jigs for the many pompano that have been showing up in Tampa Bay recently.  

Daiwa BG 2500 Specs

daiwa bg reel review

I could bore you with the flashy phrases and new words from Daiwa’s website such as an “Over-Sized Digigear” or an “ABS Spool”, but you can go on their website and read that for yourself.

Instead, I’m going to tell you the pros and cons that I have noticed while using this reel… because let’s face it, no reel is perfect.

First, Let’s take a look at the core stats straight from Daiwa’s website.

Daiwa BG 2500 Specs:

  • Weight: 9.3 oz
  • Line Capacity: 190 yds of 10 lb. braid
  • Drag Capacity: 13.2 lbs. of drag
  • Ball Bearings: 6+1
  • Gear Ratio: 5.6:1
  • Line Per Handle Turn: 33.2”

Daiwa BG 2500 Price:

The Daiwa BG 2500 retails at roughly $100 dollars.

So that puts it roughly equivalent to other popular spinning reels such as the Shimano NASCI and the Penn Battle II.

Daiwa BG 2500 Spinning Reel Review

Here’s a video review that shows the pros and cons that I’ve found on the Daiwa BG 2500 reel so far.

I’ll update this post over time if anything else comes up, and I welcome any and all feedback from you in the comment section below if you’d like to share your experiences using the Daiwa BG reel with the community.

CLICK HERE to see the full cross-brand review that I recently updated for the Insider Club members.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, our goal should be to get a reel that best matches our needs while staying in budget.

This new Daiwa BG has proven to be a quality reel so far after putting it to the test for the past few months.

So far, I have been quite impressed with this reel.

It seems like a good deal at the $100 mark where it typically is listed.

And I just noticed that it is listed on Amazon for just ~$90 which seems to be an extremely good deal.

I’ll continue to use this reel to see how its longevity around saltwater holds up, and I’ll update this post for any notable updates.

Please feel free to use the Comment section below to describe your experience using Daiwa BG spinning reels or if you have any questions.

Fish on!

We’re looking for a few good inshore fishermen to join our private fishing club…

Qualifications:

  • Do you love catching inshore fish like redfish, trout, snook, tarpon, black drum, and flounder?
  • Are you coachable?
  • Are you a positive person who is fun to be around?
  • Can you afford to invest 27 pennies a day?

Then we want you in the club!

Click here to join today.

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Delzo
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Delzo

Where is the origin country daiwa BG is made?Is it all daiwa BG made in china?

Larry Elkins
Member

Luke I bought the Daiwa BG 2500 and the TFO professional MH rod great combination. I had some snow falling and I was casting a Plug into the bucket. I love it. Good call. I may buy another set up. Thanks again as always you did a great job. I wanted to ask you if you fished inshore near turtle beach on midnight pass near siesta key and Sarasota. That is the area I do a lot of my fishing and also Sarasota bay.

Steve hicks Hicks
Member

i have a freguo 2000 is it a good reel 3000 clash 3000 stradic 3000 freguo 3000 bg reels new to spincasting reels great at baitcasting lures

Dan Friberg
Member

Have you tried any of the kastking reels for salt water ? And what is your fav.reel for salt water ?

Noel Parrish
Member

Luke, l’m going out to purchase the Daiwa BG 2500 reel and All StarInshore 7.6 ft. Medium action rod. I fish for Reds, Snook, Trout all inshore. What test braid should l use. I expect to purchase an extra spool so what would you spool that up with? Thank you so much for your valued comments. Noel Parrish

Christopher Hobby
Member

Thank you Luke Simonds for this review. Haven’t been happy with my Penn reels lately. And been wantin’ to change some of my reels and was recommended this reel by a local bait shop around where I live. Love Shimano first regardless. Still have a Stradic ci 4 from 3 generations ago. Love it. But want to try this reel out and see if Daiwa is good.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Thanks for the review, not being a fan of replacing high dollar reels every few years I’ve gravitated back to the old version BG reels. I might have to give this new version a try though, would be good to have a few reels I can run braid on. Glad Daiwa seems to have picked a reel worthy of the BG name (unlike Mitchell and the current batch of terrible 300’s), I sure hope they don’t phase out production of the original BG reels though.

Ted
Guest
Ted

A reel I’ve been extremely pleased with is the Daiwa Revros 2500H, which my good buddies at All About Fishing in Sarasota put me on to. It is a great value at under $50. Actually, Amazon sells it for $34.95, but I prefer to pay slightly more and support a local tackle shop which has helped me out a ton with my fishing needs and answering my multiple questions. You might say that any reel this inexpensive has to be trash, but I’ve found it to perform extremely well in landing some very respectable redfish, snook and trout. Drag is only rated for 8.8 lb, but that has proven to be plenty with light braid. Drag and gears are very smooth. I wade fish or out of a kayak exclusively and only with artificial lures. This reel is considerably lighter, which I find to be a plus on a day of many casts, since I have a torn rotator cuff to deal with in my right shoulder. Before trying this reel, my go to reel was a PENN Spinfisher V, which is a sturdy work horse, but also a lot heavier. Also, when the PENN gets dunked and has to be rebuilt, it costs at least $25. The guys at All About Fishing made a good point: if and when the Revros starts to corrode and can’t be brought back to full performance with a good cleaning/greasing, it’s not all that expensive to just replace it. So far, however, I’ve found it to hold up just as well as the Spinfisher V.

Bruce Gillikin
Member

I own 3 BG’s and cannot say ANYTHING negative about them. After more than 5 decades of fishing, you know I have been through lots of reels and rods. These are some of my favorite.

Michael McMillan
Member

Just for an addition and response to Jonathon, as well as tab bit of trivial facts….The Daiwa BG 1500, 2000 and 2500 reels all share the same body. The big differences lie in the drag mechanism, spool/rotor and handle. The 3000 size is the next step up but not sharing too many of the external parts, such as the spool/rotor, as the smaller 1500, 2000 and 2500 or the larger 3500 and 4000 (which evidently share everything but the spool size). The drag mechanism is the same on the 1500 and 2000 (the larger spool capacity being the difference on the 2000) and the 2500, 3000, 3500 and 4000 all share the same drag configuration (important consideration).
For me, and where I normally roam, the BG 2500 seems the better all-around skinny water/nearshore artificial baits working reel with 190 yards of 15# braid…160 yards of 20# if you feel the need…and with a drag tough enough to handle sum SEE-RIOUS attitudes. The 3000 and above seems more in tune with dead/live bait drowning and naps, although I’ve done some one-ounce silver spoon surf drowning with my BG 4500 (My arms and back are still pumped from that venture). I have been asked as to why not just use the 2500 with the 10# and underweight line instead of buying a different reel like the 2000 if the bodies are the same anyway. Well, for one important item…and bear with me (because I’ve already tried it)…The smaller diameter of the 2000 (and 1500) spool handles the lighter weight line far better, with a far cleaner release and less line trouble than the larger 2500 spool diameter. And after I got the casting course from these Salt Strong guys and corrected some not so obvious problems with my technique, the differences between the reels were quite obvious…particularly with ultra-light lures I use with the BG 2000 and its Temple Fork ultralight rod. (I think I can feel the fish sniff the jerk shad…Just sayin’ )
All of this comes down to personal preference for there are some very good reels less (and more) expensive out there of which possibly any one of them may suite the present needs. I just got hooked by the Daiwa BG reels several years ago…which is my personal preference right now. But, for all practical purposes, if you’re looking for something to handle only 30+ pound reds, definitely “lean” toward the larger reels…but you will be trading a lot of infrequent use for the rare times you may hook up with a tanker red where the 2500 size can handle everything up to and including the infrequent heart pounders… Fish On!!

Michael McMillan
Member

I actually have four of the BG series…Two BG-2500s with 15# Power Pro, one BG-2000 (big spool 1500) with 10# Power Pro and one BG 4500 “horse” with 30# Spider Wire braid. About 90% of my fishing is with the 2500s and they have handled some seriously big fish and screaming runs without missing a beat (I actually got past the 75 yard knot on one occasion holding on to a seriously agitated drum that was not happy with being detained…Thanks for the suggestion, guys). I know there will be different situations experienced by most all, but fishing the surf with the BGs, as well as the skinny water off the Laguna Madre here on the Texas Gulf Coast, fairly well exposes these reels to some serious soaking. After a week and a half long venture on the coast, rinsing the reels with fresh water after each use, I took them apart to re-lube (and inspect) and found no sign of water or moisture inside. The BGs had never been completely “immersed” for sure, but my other reels, used the same way, always had indication of moisture inside after such usage. I’ve had the BG-2500s for nearly 2 years so I do have a bit of history and time with them. I’ve had several other spinners of similar size, but I fell in love with the Daiwa BG reels from my first one. The BG-2500s (and the BG-2000) feel a tad heavier than other brands of similar size but seem to balance out my Temple Fork and St. Croix rods very nicely when tossing plastics.

Jonathon Cavazos
Member

I was thinking about purchasing the 2500 or the 3000. Wanted something that can be able to handle some of those bigger, more aggressive redfish. Would you recommend the 2500 or the 3000?

David Yarber
Member

Have you checked out the Daiwa Legalis or Exceler LT series? Less money, twice the drag, and almost half the weight of the BG. Bought 2 with CJ rods that Tony recommended. SWEET!!

David Stoots
Member

Any suggestions for rods to pair this reel up with?

Skip Shineman
Member

Much technical information here:

http://www.alanhawk.com/reviews/bg16.html

This guy dissected a BG 8000 and believes that Daiwa has set a new standard for quality in a value priced reel and Shimano, Okuma and Penn will need to take notice.

That said, I bought at 2500 through Amazon and it has a defective, sticky action out of the box and is going back. The 3000 I bought at the same time seems good to go, so I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt so far.

JD Pitts
Guest
JD Pitts

There have been a few reviews that state the issue of the “stickiness” due to the grease used at the factory. They advise that ALL reels be cleaned upon purchase, and quality grease be used in place of the factory stuff…to a man, I haven’t seen anyone complain about any of the BG reels after they changed the grease. A few have stated that there is a slight loss in initial “free spool spin” after changing the grease, but that as you use it, it will free up and remain smooth over the usage of the reels until time to clean them again…just in case you like the reel other than that issue

Jeremy Nawyn
Member

Thanks for the reviews! I appreciate the unbiased and informative information.
Any chance you could test out the Okuma RTX series? In my reel shopping, and subsequent rabbit trail hunting, I saw that these are very lightweight reels, but I don’t have any experience with Okuma.

Rusty
Guest
Rusty

I have two of these reels and am very disappointed with them .If you are a wade or a surf fisherman. This reel is not for you. It does not take any water at all and it soaks in and gets dirty right away.I have had both reels since the first of the summer and have had to have them cleaned three times each.They are not the same as the old BG reels.I do admit the drag it great and it is a smooth reel. A lot smoother than the old work horses the old ones are, but the old ones did not get dirty as easy.They have a problem with the sealing of the reel and that is a big deal when you saltwater fish.

Mike
Guest
Mike

Just grease the insides heavily first before using and use corrosion X.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I understand what you are saying, but you should not have to tear down a new reel to fix a problem that should be done by Daiwa. This reel will get dirty with just salt spray on it.Do not get wrong I have a few Daiwa reels and like them.

John delozier
Guest
John delozier

Its not a waterproof reel never intended to be ..your thinking van staal at 400 $

wayne delozier
Guest
wayne delozier

Again its not a dunk and go reel no where on its website does it mention this .and sand will get into anything unless its mag sealed or waterproof .then your talking a whole diff kind of reel and whole diff price point….its like saying my 1/4 ton truck is a pos cause it wont haul 3/4 ton .

Pat Ogletree
Member

I was hoping you would test this reel, I’ve been looking at it for a while. I’ve used a lot of Daiwa’s products and have been generally happy with them. This one sounds like a winner.

Mike Welch
Guest
Mike Welch

I have this reel and love it and getting another for Christmas as a present. For the size of the reel it can handle most inshore species fine from my experience and my go to set up in most of the time over my baitcasters and larger spinning reel. Redfish, flounder, speckled trout all no problem for this reel. Bull red or large black drum may may take some time and hard on fish but I am sure this reel can handle it. Nice drag system

Andrew Williams
Member

I like my Cabelas Salt Striker reel. I have been using it for 3years with no problems. I spray it with fresh water after each use.
It is still smooth & corrosion free. I am not sure what the weight is.

Felix peckinpaugh Peckinpaugh
Member

is it necessary to spray a reel after fishing