The Best Fishing Knots Of All Time [Ranked Strongest To Weakest]

It’s fishing knot time!

Do you want to know something that might shock you about fishing knots?

After testing hundreds of fishing knots over the past couple of years, I’ve learned one very important lesson…

The “100% fishing knot” is a myth.

Why?

Physics.

Yes, simple physics is the reason why. Pretty much all knots will create a weak point on the line given that it creates a point on the line where a max load is hitting it from more than just one direction.

And although there are some instances where the main line (or leader) will break before the knot fails, there is no single knot that can always do that with all types of lines.

So step #1 in using the strongest possible knots for your fishing needs is to understand that there is no such thing as a “100% knot”…

And if you hear someone say that their knot is 100% without any exclusions, then they likely have never tested it out in a controlled test with multiple lines, so I be wary of their recommendation.

Here’s the hard truth…

Your favorite fishing knot is weak, and so is mine

This is simply due to the fact the contorting line and creating hard turns that get put under tension will always create a weak point in the line making it the weakest point in the system (assuming that the main line is not compromised).

Note: This weak point is almost always at the first hard turn in the top section of the knot coming from the main line, so it most often leaves a clean break which looks like the mainline simply snapped when an angler examines the line after a break-off. 

Now that we’re past the first hurdle (acceptance), step #2 is to actually test our knots to make sure that you don’t lose the fish of a lifetime due using a knot that isn’t the absolute best for each connection in your line system.

To help save you time in testing knots, I’ll be displaying results from my continued testing on this page.

Best of all, the individual fishing knots will be ranked based on their strength & performance results for the following knot connection categories:

Do You Know The STRONGEST Fishing Knot For Every Situation?

The results of these knot strength tests might surprise you!

Click here to download the FREE “Ultimate Fishing Knot PDF Guide” (only takes a few seconds)

 

Knot Category Groupings

Feel free to use the links below to skip down to the knot connection that you’re most interested in. Otherwise, you can simply scroll down to see all of the knots.

And if you don’t see your favorite knot listed, just leave a comment on the bottom of this post (click here) and I’ll add it to my list of fishing knots to evaluate.

So let’s get started…

Definition of Bad, Good, & Great Fishing Knots

best fishing knots

Before going on the knot strength results, it is essential that we first all understand the different categories of knots in terms of their strength:

  • Bad Knot: unravels/slips when under heavy tension
  • Good Knot: does not unravel or slip (it breaks before unraveling)
  • Great Knot: does not unravel/slip and has a higher breaking point than “Good knots”

How To Determine A Bad Knot

A bad knot is very easy to see because it leaves behind the telltale sign of trouble… the curly tag end.

Yes, the curly tag end that you may have seen after a break-off means that the knot used was either a bad knot, or there was a poor job in tying a good/great knot.

So if you ever see the curly end after a break-off, do not tie the same knot the same way because it’ll likely happen again.

How To Determine A Good Knot vs. A Great Knot

The difference between a Good knot and a Great knot requires the act of intentionally breaking them under a controlled test to see how much tension they can hold before the break occurs.

This is the missing link that most anglers overlook because it requires time and effort.

I am the perfect example of this because I was even fishing tournaments with money and pride at stake and never even bothered to actually test my personal knots.

And when I finally did test my knots, I was shocked at the results… the very first test I did revealed that I was getting 30% less strength than I otherwise would have had I been simply using a different knot for my line to leader connection (replacing the Double-Uni knot with the FG knot… both shown below).

So I highly recommend testing out your knots. And if you’d like a shortcut, this page shows the results from my testing below to help guide you to the best knots from my many tests done so far.

And I’ll continually update this “best fishing knot” post as more and more knots are tested so that you can have the latest and greatest data.

So if you want to save time while maximizing your line strength, this post is for you.

What Are The Best Fishing Knots?

There are many different types of lines which in many cases have completely different textures, sizes, and friction coefficients.

So we’ll be evaluating knots based on the type of line used within these general line categories:

  • Braid
  • Monofilament/Fluorocarbon
  • Wire (Coming soon)
  • Flyline (Coming soon)

And to truly evaluate a fishing knot, it is essential to focus each test on a specific type of connection because a knot that is very good for line-to-line connections is often not good at all for line-to-lure connections (and visa-Aversa).

So we’ll break out the rankings shown below into the following connections types for each line category:

  • Line-to-Line Knots
  • Line-to-Hook/Lure Knots [Snug]
  • Line-to-Hook/Lure Knots [Loop]

Let’s get started!

Do You Know The STRONGEST Fishing Knot For Every Situation?

The results of these knot strength tests might surprise you!

Click here to download the FREE “Ultimate Fishing Knot PDF Guide” (only takes a few seconds)

 

Best Fishing Knots for Braided Line

braided fishing line

Braided line has quickly become an extremely popular choice for inshore anglers because it allows for longer casts and better feel of lures given that its strength to diameter ratio is so much higher than mono/fluoro lines.

Plus, it has very little stretch which enables the angler to feel even the lightest of taps on the other end of the line.

But braid requires much for friction within the knot compared to monofilament so it almost always requires a different knot than the traditional knots used on mono.

Best Braid to Leader Knots

To kick things off, we’ll start with the most important of all connections for most saltwater anglers who use a lighter main line to connect to a stronger leader.

This setup is becoming very common because it allows for the overall system to have optimal casting performance (due to the lighter line in the reel) while having a stronger leader line at the business end to hold up to the sharp teeth and/or rough mouths of the target species.

Fluorocarbon is the most commonly used monofilament leader these days since it’s known for being less visible in the water while also being more resistant to abrasions, so this analysis is focused on connecting a braided line to a fluorocarbon leader.

Here are the top 5 ranking knots based on the knot tests I’ve done so far:

  1. PR Bobbin Knot [requires tools]
    1. Pro: This is an extremely strong knot when tied correctly
    2. Con: Requires tools to tie and takes a long time (extremely tough to do while on the water)
  2. FG Knot*
    • Pro: Thinnest knot I’ve ever seen while also having the highest breaking strength.
    • Con: Requires a strong cinch before cutting the tags so that it fully locks into place.
      • Note: Only use this knot if tying a braided line to a stronger mono/fluoro leader.
  3. 6 Turn Surgeon’s Knot
    • Pro: Very quick to tie while having a shocking strong breaking point and can be tied using lines of any size
    • Con: Bulkier and slightly weaker than the FG knot
  4. Doubled-Over Double Uni Knot
    • Pro: Easy knot to tie and it can be used for all connections
    • Con: Up to 30% weaker than the FG knot in my tests
  5. Crazy Alberto Knot
    • Pro: Nice low profile knot with a strong breaking point
    • Con: Up to 30% weaker than the FG knot in my tests
  6. Improved Albright
    • Pro: Nice low profile knot with a strong breaking point
    • Con: Weaker than the FG knot and the Crazy Alberto

Click here to see the first contest I hosted for this connection.

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

Best Doubled Braid-to-Leader Knots

Many anglers like to double the braid by forming a loop at the end of the braid and then tying a line-to-line knot to connect the doubled braid to the leader.

In many instances, this does increase the overall line strength for anglers who are using a lighter braid relative to the leader.

However, the FG knot tied on a single line has proven to outperform the doubled knot connections in most of my testing. The only combination that consistently beats the single line FG knot is the use of the FG knot to connect a doubled line formed by the Bimini Twist to the leader.

Line Doubling Knots [Braid]

  1. Bimini Twist
    • Pro: Extremely strong doubling knot
    • Con: It often requires more twists (30+) with braid so that it won’t slip
  2. Spider Hitch
    • Pro: Faster to tie than the Bimini Twist
    • Con: Not as strong as the Bimini Twist
  3. Surgeon Loop (6-turn)
    • Pro: Extremely fast to tie
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Bimini Twist

Doubled Line To Leader Knots [Braid to Fluoro]

  1. FG Knot
    • Pro: Thinnest knot I’ve ever seen while also having the highest breaking strength.
    • Con: Requires a very strong cinch before cutting the tags so that it fully locks into place.
      • Note: Only use this knot if tying a braided line to a stronger mono/fluoro leader.
  2. No-Name Knot (aka- Bristol Knot)
    • Pro: Quick and easy knot to tie
    • Con: Not as strong as the FG knot
  3. Yucatan Knot
    • Pro: Quick and easy to tie (very similar to Bristol knot)
    • Con: Not as strong as the FG knot

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

Best Braid-to-Swivel/Lure/Hook Knots

This next category is focused for anglers who use braided line and like to use swivels.

But it could also be useful if you like to use connect your braided line directly to your terminal tackle (although I do not recommend tying directly to your lure or hook using braid because fish can see it so much better than mono/fluoro… instead, use a ~20 to 30 inch leader in between your braid and lure/hook).

  1. Braid Uni Knot
    • Pro: Great knot that is very strong and easy to tie
    • Con: Although an easy knot to tie, some are faster
  2. San Diego Jam Knot
    • Pro: Strong knot that is easy and quick to tie
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Modified Uni Knot
  3. Palomar Knot
    • Pro: Very fast and easy to tie
    • Con: Not as strong with braid as it is with mono
  4. Orvis Knot
    • Pro: Quick and easy to tie
    • Con: Not as strong with braid as it is with mono
  5. Improved Cinch Knot
    • Pro: Quick and easy to tie
    • Con: This knot doesn’t perform well with braid (prone to slippage)
  6. Clinch Knot
    • Pro: Quick and easy to tie
    • Con: This knot doesn’t perform well with braid (prone to slippage)

Click here to see results from a contest I hosted for this connection.

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

Best Fishing Knots for Monofilament/Fluorocarbon Line

best fishing knots for mono line

Monofilament line is used by almost all anglers in some capacity, so I’ve done many tests with knots using mono line.

For tests that I’ve done for my personal use, I focused on Fluorocarbon line, which is a specific type of mono.

Many anglers use Fluorocarbon for their leader material since it’s known to be stronger the less visible than traditional monofilament line.

Here’s what I’ve tested so far:

Best Mono-to-Mono Knots

Here are the top mono-to-mono knots that I have tested:

  1. 3 Turn Surgeon’s Knot*
    • Pro: Extremely easy and fast knot to tie with very strong holding strength
    • Con: Need to tie this before tying on a lure or hook
  2. SS Knot
    • Pro: Versatile knot connection with an impressive breaking strength
    • Con: Not quite as fast or strong as the Surgeon’s knot
  3. Double Uni Knot
    • Pro: Easy knot to tie and it can be used for all connections
    • Con: Not as fast or strong as the Surgeon’s knot
  4. Albright Special
    • Pro: Easy knot to tie that looks very nice once completed
    • Con: Not as fast or strong as the Surgeon’s knot
  5. Blood Knot
    • Pro: Easy to tie with lines of similar size
    • Con: Not as effective with lines of different diameters

Click here to see results from a contest I hosted for this connection.

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

Best Line-to-Hook Knots [Mono/Fluoro]

Now that we covered the very important line-to-line connection, let’s dig in to the best fishing knots for connecting our hooks and lures to the end of the line.

For this category, we’ll split it up into two sections to cover the two core different types of connections:

  1. Loop Knot – Leaves a loop so that the lure/hook has more range of motion in the water (less strength compared to snug)
  2. Snug Knot – Line hugs around hook/lure eye forming a strong connection (less range of motion)

Note: I’ve specifically focused on fluorocarbon line since it’s the most popular for saltwater anglers… if you want me to test these with standard mono, just let me know and I’ll add it to this post.

Best Loop Knot to Lure/Hook

When fishing with artificial lures, using a loop knot is an advantage because it allows the lure to have more motion in the water which most often leads to more strikes.

But the downside is that loop knots are not as strong as snug knots, so that needs to be taken into account when selecting your leader line size and when setting drag.

Here are my favorites:

  1. Rapala Loop Knot
    • Pro: The strongest loop knot I’ve tested so far
    • Con: Takes a bit longer to tie than many others and leaves a tag end facing up which can snag weeds/debris
  2. Non-Slip Loop Knot (aka. Kreh Loop)*
    • Pro: Very quick and easy to tie and has a tag end that points down towards the lure (more weedless)
    • Con: Just a tad weaker than the Rapalla knot
  3. Figure 8 Loop Knot
    • Pro: Tested to be very strong (very close to Rapalla Loop Knot
    • Con: Takes longer to tie than the Non-Slip Loop knot and does not have a weedless tag end
  4. Perfection Loop Knot
    • Pro: Strong loop knot that is quick to tie
    • Con: Tougher to tie since this knot requires the hook/lure to pass through a loop
  5. Canoe Man Loop Knot
    • Pro: Extremely fast loop knot to tie
    • Con: Strength test was great with traditional mono, but it didn’t perform nearly as well with fluorocarbon

Click here to see the first contest I did with this important connection.

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

Best “Snug” Knot to Lure/Hook

When going for maximum strength when having action in the water is not as important, then the snug knot is the way to go because a good snug knot will be a significant amount stronger than a good loop knot.

Here’s my ranking of the Snug knots that I’ve tested so far:

  1. Palomar Knot
    • Pro: Very strong knot that is easy to tie when using bare hooks
    • Con: Can become cumbersome when using larger lures because it requires the lure pass through a loop
  2. Uni Knot
    • Pro: Good knot that is fairly quick to tie and can be used for almost any connection
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Palomar knot
  3. Orvis Knot*
    • Pro: Very quick and easy knot to tie that is very strong
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Palomar knot
  4. Clinch Knot
    • Pro: Quick and easy knot to tie
    • Con: Not as fast and easy as the Orvis Knot nor as strong as the Palomar Knot
  5. Double Davy Knot
    • Pro: Very quick and easy to tie (just 1 more twist vs. the Davie Knot)
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Orvis knot which is just as easy to tie
  6. Davy Knot
    • Pro: Very quick and easy to tie
    • Con: Not quite as strong as the Orvis knot which is just as easy to tie

Click here to see the first contest I did with this important connection.

Note: If your favorite knot isn’t included, leave a comment below and I’ll test it out and add it to the list.

More test data getting added soon, so be sure to bookmark this page!

Conclusion

best fishing knots

Of the many factors that determine if you land the fish of a lifetime that you hook, the one that we have 100% control over is the quality of the knots that we use.

So it’s essential for us to select the absolute best fishing knot for each connection to get the most overall line strength.

You have certainly heard the saying, “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link…” Well, a rod, reel, and an angler are only as strong as the knot between them and the fish.

Make it count.

There isn’t (and never will be) one fishing knot that can do everything with all line types and connection needs, so make sure to be mindful of the knot options you have for each connection need you have.

This post will continually grow over time as knot suggestions come in, so leave a comment below letting us know of any other knots you’d like us to add to this analysis.

Note: The * symbols next to the knots listed above are the ones that I personally use for each of the respective connections.

The tests have been done using 10 to 20 lb PowerPro tied to 20 to 30 lb Ande and Seaguar fluorocarbon.

Do You Know The STRONGEST Fishing Knot For Every Situation?

The results of these knot strength tests might surprise you!

Click here to download the FREE “Ultimate Fishing Knot PDF Guide” (only takes a few seconds)

 

Related Posts:

1. How To Tie The Perfect Leader Assembly For Inshore Fishing

2. What Is The Proper Drag Tension To Use For A Fishing Reel?

3. How To Get A Hooked Fish Out Of Structure Without Breaking Off

4. The Best Online Fishing Club…

P.S. – If you think your angler friends or fishing networks would enjoy seeing this, please Tag them or Share this with them. You Rock! Pa-POW!

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Peter Gibbinson
Peter Gibbinson
1 day ago

Be interested to know your thoughts on my dad’s knot (he was a well known fishing journalist) – it’s called the “Jim Gibbinson knot” – if you google it you will see some images of it.
To describe it – take hook/swivel – pass line twice through eye – double line back on itself and then go back over the doubled back length 5/6 times (going back towards the eye/swivel) – pass the line through the loop formed at the eye/swivel – whilst holding the unfinished knot together between your fingers. Then pass the line though the loop formed at the top of the knot (i.e furthest away from the eye/swivel) and pull tight.
It’s shown on the below link below under the book images (I have nothing to do with the book ..neither did my father..)
Works on any material, and super strong and reliable – a consistently v good knot.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.co.uk%2FCarp-Fishing-Knots-Wire-version%2Fdp%2FB0743C7T39&psig=AOvVaw1AUxMALMFdL4l5J_53prSS&ust=1597227584541000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKjSrtP2kusCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

Barry craig
Barry craig
9 days ago

Hi Folks. Have you tried and or strength tested braid to braid connected via a splice? Or a double created in braid with a splice? I use both approaches to connect mainline braid to a much heavier braid shock leader. Yup I know a splice is not actually a knot and you won’t splice anything easily on a beach/ boat, but it is easy enough to do before a fishing trip and sure beats casting a knot through your guides. I have never broken a splice, but have not scientifically tested one either 🙂
Regards
Barry

Barry
Barry
7 days ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

You are correct. It would be hard and given how small the knots are in 10lb, it is probably not needed. I don’t fish that light very often. Typically I use a splice to add a heavier (say 80lb) braid to a 30 or 40lb mainline to avoid donating tackle to the ocean when casting with a ‘bionic finger’. Also to tie a knotless loop on the end of any weight of braid for purposes of a loop to loop connection to a fluoro leader. But I enjoy a challenge and have a method using the shaft of the needle to flatten the braid before each ‘stitch’, so will have a go at splicing some light braid 🙂

Louis
Louis
11 days ago

I heard the GT knot beat all other braid to mono knots in testing by the IGFA

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Interesting. Is it possible tl test a double uni against the GT knot with a Fig. 8 amd a uni?

Alex
Alex
1 day ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Thank you Luke. I only tie a fig 8 on a fluoro leader side because it is slightly slimmer than the uni.
Other knots that use different methods on the leader end are Red Phillips, variations on Alberto knot and an FG.

Cristi Neagu
Cristi Neagu
16 days ago

Have you tested the Mono/Fluoro to lure/hook knots with very heavy (1mm) fluoro line? Some knots may not be feasible to tie in the same manner or with the same number of loops with heavy line. Others may not hold at all due to line stiffness. Considering a lot of people use heavy fluoro as a pike leader, it would be very good to know which knot is best.
Thank you.

Tim
Tim
20 days ago

With the Yucatan knot, it seems most tie it like the suffix video these days, which is not a Yucatan.
I double the braid, no knot needed, then wrap braid twelve times around leader, tag end through loop, pull tight. Which is a true Yucatan.
Did you test this version? It is what I use for retying leaders on the kayak. At home I use the FG.

Thanks!

Dave
Dave
21 days ago

Give the Jacks Knot a try. It’s not well known but in my testing it’s a strong knot. You’ll probably have to Google it or follow this link: https://news.orvis.com/fly-fishing/videos-tie-jacks-knot

Great stuff!

Richard Davis
Richard Davis
25 days ago

My local saltwater tackle shop recommend the improved San Diego knot with mono/flouro leader. What say you? I come from a freshwater bass background and had no idea how much to learn about saltwater fishing, and the wide range of line a connections/hooks strength for what looks pretty much the same. I am sticking to Owner so far. Thanks for any reply

Barry Mong
Barry Mong
29 days ago

Could you test the Shins knot ? Shin Fukae uses it. Thank you

Austin
Austin
1 month ago

Hey Salt strong idk if you saw my email but my theory is when you tested your braid palomar against the braid uni it won the first time because the loop was on the knot but the rest of the time you had the loop above the knot and was wondering if you could test if having the loop on the knot increases strength and may outperform your braid uni

denisiel
denisiel
1 month ago

What lbs line and which knot to use for the fluorocarbon leader if using PowerPro braid 10lb as the mainline? 1000 or 2500 reel and fishing mostly for trout up to 5 lbs and stripers maybe to 10 lbs? FG and Alberto knots are only for heavier fluoro line as compared to the braid. I planned on using 6 lb fluoro. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

Last edited 1 month ago by denisiel
Austin
Austin
1 month ago
Reply to  denisiel

Alberto works with lighter leader also I recommend you look up tackle advisors modified version on YouTube

denisiel
denisiel
1 month ago
Reply to  Austin

Thanks very much, Austin! I went with the Alberto and caught my first shad and it worked. Appreciate you taking time to help me 🙂

Matt Loutzenhiser
Matt Loutzenhiser
2 months ago

So I’ve fished on and off my whole life, but after being in Florida for almost 2 years I’m excited to dive into fishing. I have always struggled with knots and have lost my fair share of lures at the hook because of a bad knot.

But the other night I was fishing a bridge in Miami and had something on the line for a few minutes prior to the lure coming out. I was disappointed when the line went slack and reeled my line in. Looked at my leader and it was almost frayed from the fish running against the bridge.

Finally I realized that my knots didn’t fail for once with something big on the line. Pretty stoked on it. Thanks for the knowledge dudes. Can’t wait to nail what ever was the the end of the line soon.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 months ago

You should put down the snell version of the uni knot it’s much better and tighter because it goes around the hook instead of the outside, making it more efficient and tighter.. I’m talking about the “Best “Snug” Knot to Lure/Hook” 2nd best knot. It’s basically the same instead of wrapping around both the lines you wrap around the line and the hook so you make the loop go to the opposite side. just a thought

Rick Wynn
Rick Wynn
3 months ago

Hi Luke.

Something has always bothered me about the Uni Knot. It’s the way the whole thing crushes when you dress the knot. Yes, it’s easy to tie, even in the dark, which is why I use it, but it seems to me, the Hangman’s Knot is a much “prettier” knot, that does not crush. I see that there is some misinformation out there on the internet, stating that the hangman’s knot and the uni-knot are the same, but that is not true. They are completely different knots. The hangman’s knot wraps all 3 lines as you wind it up, whereas the uni-knot wraps 2 lines. So my question is, has the Hangman’s Knot ever been tested for strength as a fishing knot?

Thanks!
Rick

Anonymous
Anonymous
3 months ago
Reply to  Rick Wynn

Hi Rick.
Onother knot similar to a Hangman is a San Diego Jam.
There is a variation to a Uni called Fish-n-Fool knot. In essense, it is a uni which passed through the eye of the hook twice before tying the normal uni over.

Emiliano
Emiliano
4 months ago

What about the GT knot?

Emiliano
Emiliano
3 months ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

I supposed, thanks!

Anonymous
Anonymous
4 months ago

Hi I was watching Bass guy Gman Gerald Swimdle show his knot, he doubles line thru jig then wraps around the main line several times and passes this doubled line thru the loop and tighten it leaves 3 tags to cut ,a double and a single ,he says best knot for flourocarbon. I will forward the video, hope it comes through. You guys are tops good luck

JA

Alex
Alex
3 months ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I think this knot is called a Doubled Clinch knot.
However, Gman called it different????

Anonymous
Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Alex

Sounds like the tuna knot

RICHARD FIORENTINO
RICHARD FIORENTINO
4 months ago

With a lot of time on my hands, like everyone else, I have reviewed this excellent knot guide . I fish braid to mono. If anyone can master the FG, Freh loop, the uni ( and double-uni), the surgeons,The palomar and the improved hitch, I don’t think you need anything else for inshore fishing.

Anonymous
Anonymous
4 months ago

A quick comment. I agree that a well tied above average knot will beat a poorly tied better knot.

Mabry Edwards Jr
Mabry Edwards Jr
5 months ago

How does a fluorocarbon leader inserted into hollow core braid with DaHo hollow threading and reverse latch needles compare to PR Bobbin Knot and the FG Knot? When it comes to hollow core wind on leaders (not to be confused with the loop to loop methods), it’s definitely smoother than the burnt ends, etc. What about line strength? The harder one pulls, the stronger and more uniform the squeeze. It works offshore and now there’s a source for 20 lb. and 30 lb. ultra thin hollow core braid. I just installed 30 lb braid (with .26 diameter; blue label fluoro 30 lb .21 dia) on a new Shimano Tranx 200 (6.2 gear ratio) and I’m confident the no knot connection will not slip. Another 100% braid to fluoro connection?

Steve
Steve
5 months ago

I’ve been using the FG knot for a while and always use a heavier Braid (15lb) to an 8lb mono and I have no issues. Most of the bass anglers I’ve seen use a heavier braid main line and a lighter leader. Any reason for the warning you put on the knot to only use a heavier leader?

Steve
Steve
5 months ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

So only use a leader that is a thicker diameter then the braid correct? Thanks

Doug
Doug
7 months ago

There is a version of the improved clinch knot that is stronger than a palomar. I’ve won a contest during a marlin tournament against 100 other professional crews with this knot.

Eric Cabrera
Eric Cabrera
7 months ago

Can you test the GT knot. I hear its stronger than the FG but has a slightly larger profile. Is this true? I currently use FG knot ALWAYS!

Zamps
Zamps
7 months ago

Could you please evaluate the Penny Knot. Used frequently in Australia.

Richard
Richard
7 months ago

What about the TN Knot in mono connection to metal ring or hook?

Andy
Andy
8 months ago

Hi, can u include GT knot too?

Thomas KAsekamp
Thomas KAsekamp
8 months ago

Have you guys tested the Seaguar knot for tying leader to braid?

Chris Soud
Chris Soud
8 months ago

You said that fg to Bimini consistently beat single line fg. Please explain. Good information.

Alfredgeorge Deanperry
Alfredgeorge Deanperry
9 months ago

It seems to me like one could get by in many situations with just the easy-to-tie Palomar and surgeon’s knot/loop and not sacrifice much knot strength. As a result, I’d like to see a discussion about the limits of such versatile knots and the situations which absolutely require knowing some of the less versatile, more specialized (and usually more-difficult-to-tie) knots.

Lee
Lee
9 months ago

I suggest one more knot to test (Double Zeppelin Bend) for line-to-line connection of similar diameters, then I’ll stop. I tied two pieces of #6 mono together. At one junction I tied a 3 Turn Surgeon’s. At the other I tied a Zeppelin Bend or a Double Zeppelin Bend (2-wrap collars). I placed hammer handles in the mono circle at 3 and 9 o’clock with the knots at 12 and 6 o’clock, then pulled the two handles apart until a knot broke. The Double Zeppelin Bend was stronger than the 3 Turn Surgeon’s (3 out of 3 tries), but the Zeppelin Bend was weaker (1 out of 1 try). The single Zeppelin Bend may do better with larger diameter line. FWIW, on the International Guild of Knot Tyers Forum a guy wrote that he tested the Zeppelin Bend against the Albright Special with #10 mono and the Zeppelin Bend (single not double) won 5 out of 5 tries. That said, it is my understanding that the Albright Special works will with dissimilar lines both in material and diameter and the Zeppelin Bend probably doesn’t.

Lee
Lee
10 months ago

For a loop knot did you test the Double Dragon? By the way, there are ways to tie the Perfection Loop to a lure/hook without passing the lure/hook through the knot.

Lee
Lee
9 months ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

The simplest demo of hand tying the Double Dragon Knot that I know of is by a backpacker in the YouTube video entitled “Double Dragon and Farrimond Knots” starting at 4:45. He shows 3 ways of tying the DDK: at the end of the line, in the middle, and to a lure. I use light mono (#4-10) in the Southern California surf, but his method should work OK for heavier line if you don’t mind wasting a little at the tag end. By the way, as a retired scientist I love your approach!

Drob
Drob
10 months ago

Im surprised Sandiego jam was not close to the top of mono/flouro to hook connections.
Can you add the chain knot to you future tests. This is very popular with japanese jiggers to connect their leader to jigs.

Jim
Jim
11 months ago

Been using improved locking figure eight knot for 50 years. Easy to tie , very strong, dose in my belief everything from line joining to tackle construction.

Jim
Jim
11 months ago

have you tested the J knot against the surgeon 3 turn knot?

Jim
Jim
11 months ago
Reply to  Jim

I have not, what should I test for? Strength, practicality? I have often wondered how it’Compares. I do know this , I have tried this knot thousands of times and it thrills me every time. Never found a need to search for another , But interested

Nick
Nick
11 months ago

Hey Luke thanks for testing these knots accurately this page is great.
Im interested in finding the strongest setup to make paternoster rigs, up until now I have just been tieing them very simply like this,

https://youtu.be/zlAen8jUc3c

But then I watched this video where he tieing what he calls the “T Knot” for creating paternoster droppers;

https://youtu.be/_KL8ej_8jMs

Could you please test the difference in these setups?

Also when once you have a dropper do you think that it would be stronger to tie a hook onto it with the palamot knot or just putting the hook through the loop and back onto itself like in the video.

Thanks

Ben
Ben
11 months ago
Reply to  Nick

I would love to see you test different paternoster/dropper rigs. Here is another interesting one I think would be worth testing.
https://youtu.be/8tG5YIU2Of4

I would also like to see how the different ways to tie the snell knot test.

As always I am very appreciative of the info you provide.

Ben

Nick
Nick
11 months ago
Reply to  Ben

Ben that paternoster rigs is essentially the same knot as the first video I posted except with the twists to prevent it getting tangled, still interesting as it’s alot simpler than the T Knot setup and does pretty much the same thing.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 months ago

Check out YouTube at the SOLIS knot. It starts as an Albright but it finishes with a locking half hitch which allows it to be tied with only a few wraps. It’s tying all materials together for me. Works great,very nice.

Terr
Terr
1 year ago

“eye-crosser” with 3 loop Uni instead of two, for mono to swivel or hook. Faster and easier to tie than Palomar.

Richard
Richard
1 year ago

What about the double palomar knot “snug” with mono? Was that attempted since it was way up there in the braided line testing?

Paleo Pete
Paleo Pete
1 year ago

I found a knot once in a fly fishing pamphlet, no idea what it’s called, it uses two simple overhand knots pulling against each other, and I’ve never seen it break. I got back a “curly end” once, because I didn’t tie it well enough. Every other time I’ve gotten my lure back, the line broke above the knot, the knot and loop still attached to the hook. It makes a small loop and allows a fly or lure to have more natural action rather than following the line.

I don’t have pictures, I’ll try to describe it.

Start just like Rapala knot, simple overhand knot then put the tag end through the hook eye. Pull snug against hook eye but not tight. Tie a 2nd overhand knot above that one and around original line. Pull that one snug, close to the other overhand knot, by pulling the tag end. Both knots will separate. Then pull the main line to tighten, which will pull both against each other, and cut off a short tag end. Fast and strong, and according to the fly fishing pamphlet, also stronger than the line. I trust it on weightless worms to pull in any bass. Caught a 5.6lb bass on 6 lb line using this knot. In a brushy area.

My results have been excellent, I’ve used it for over 30 years exclusively as a knot for lures and hooks, both fresh and salt water, and it stood up to a redfish longer than the 48 quart ice chest. Numerous bass in the 3 to 6lb range.

One good tip, always cut off about 3 or 4 feet of line and retie after catching a fish or after about an hour of not catching a thing. Fish always drag your line against anything they come near, which abrades the line and creates weak spots. I think 80% of all broken lines are because of abrasions in the line caused by either catching a fish or from dragging the line across all sorts of weeds, rocks and tree trunks for an hour

EDIT – Just found Homer Rhode Loop, looks quite similar. I don’t use the double wrap for the 2nd knot, just a second simple overhand knot.

Ryan
Ryan
1 year ago

I see you recommend the FG when leader is stronger than the mainline, but what do you recommend when the main line is stronger than the leader? I’m working on my FG knots but do well with the double uni and wondering if that test stronger with a weaker leader than the FG

justin
justin
8 months ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

ya, but why do you recommend that? my braid is 30lbs and i like to switch beween 20 30 and 50 fluoro. will it fail?

also you didnt test snelling a hook?

Joan
Joan
1 year ago

I’d be careful about your physics bit… Some knots like the fish-n-fool isolate the hard turns above the stressed points, doubles the most stressed point after that and creates a cushion like the rubber bit that holds the cord coming out of a power tool. The friction of the Duncan loop over the main line reduces its force over a (relatively) long chunk of line and the extra turn through the eye provides friction that keeps the stability of the knot from collapsing or allowing the line to slip around the eye and stretch at its weakest point. And this creates a knot that almost never breaks before the line when tied with care. Physics.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

I learned a knot from a tackle shop in Newport Oregon….We call it the Newport Knot…Randy the inventor has been challenged for 20 years by guides commercial fishermen….and never lost. Something this knot does, is the line breaks above the knot every time ,never seen another knot do this, I have 2 books on fishing knots this knots beats ever single one of them with all type of line….I’ll try to make a video……

Ben Castellano
Ben Castellano
1 year ago

Hello Luke,

Your site is definitely one of the best fishing resources I have found on the Net. Much appreciated to you and all the staff.

Have you ever tested if there are different breaking strengths/reliability when tying different types of snell knots? Is one way better than another?

I would also really like to get your thoughts on the TN knot as a terminal tackle knot.

Kind regards,

Ben

Alastair Hosking
Alastair Hosking
1 year ago

I think this page is excellent – I make commercial dropper rigs for recreational fishermen and women and I learned a new and useful knot today when looking through the site. What I didn’t find was a reasonably reliable knot for joining a single strand of mono to a mono backbone. I sometimes use a T knot which I form from a modified Albright and dropper loop combo. However, when testing this in various ways I found the dropper loop failed before the modified Albright part. I was getting better strength when I made a dropper rig using just the modified Albright knot. The problem then became the look of the rig – the branches no longer stand at right angles to the backbone. Do you have any suggestions that could be explored?

Alastair Hosking
Alastair Hosking
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

HI Luke – did you get my reply via email and the photographs I sent with it?

Jon Knapp
Jon Knapp
1 year ago

I would like to see the worlds fair knot included, especially for braid line

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

What knot would you use for tying braid to a lighter mono line but same diameter, say for example you want to fill half the spool with mono and half with braid. I like to match the diameters to prevent bulges from a big knot? You say the FG knot should only used if tying a braided line to a stronger mono/fluoro leader why?

John
John
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Thank you for the reply, I don’t plan on ever getting into the mono backing its just to save $$ on not spooling an entire reel with braid. I appreciate the way you promptly answer every question people have here.

richard
richard
1 year ago

how good is the hook nail knot? Strength of knot to hook direct?

Michael
Michael
1 year ago

Trilene knot!
For mono to lure (snug) i would rate the Trilene on first place, then Palomar.

Dave Bohling
Dave Bohling
1 year ago

Seagaur knot

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Hi Luke, Interesting thread. I got a little bleary eyed reading all the comments and responses. One knot I did not see mentioned was the Slim Beauty knot. I have been using this knot for braid to flouro leader and found it to be reliable and small profile so it does not pick up grass etc. It may be known by a another name, which case, I am not familiar with it. It is easy to tie and makes a nice connection.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Forget it. Use the FG

William
William
1 year ago

I just found this tool called the Tie-Fast Knot Tool, I ties a Nail Knot; really easy for my 8 year old to learn. Would you be able to compare this knot to some of the others like the Palomar and Trilene Knots? You can also use the Nail Knot to attach line to line.

Chris
Chris
1 year ago

I would very much like to see the Trilene knot tested. Thank you for all the information.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Thanks for these knots, Im going to put some of these vids on my phone if that’s ok.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Wow this is great information thanks for sharing this. Have you tested the Miller knot? It was created by Joe Miller

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Hi have you tired the knotless knot I use it a lot and it has never failed on me. I never tested it. It’s one of the easiest knot to tie thanks

Brad
Brad
1 year ago

Hey will you test the worlds fair knot? For snug terminal tackle?

Jakob
Jakob
1 year ago

Hi guys…I need advice. Im using as SL mono 0.33, and its connected to main line 0.28. Which knot is the thinnest one?Cos of easier gliding through the glides for long cast.

tnx a lot.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Berkley trilene transoptic 0.28 is main….and shock is same model just 0.33…yr advice?

Josh
Josh
1 year ago

Please could you repeat the test series with small diameter flourocarbon lines? (ie 4-6lb)?

Particularly regarding terminal tackle knots…

Thanks!

Gregory Ramko
Gregory Ramko
1 year ago

I would like to see a strength and durability comparison between the FG knot and the Modified FG knot .

Randy
Randy
1 year ago

I didn’t see the J-knot for braid to mono/flouro. I tested against the blood knot I have been using and the J knot won 3 out of 3 for me. Reminds you of a 4turn surgeons knot but you make the loop and pass the braid tag and entire leader thru the loop alternating top and then around bottom. Hard to explain.

Barry Pretorius
Barry Pretorius
1 year ago

I don’t see that you have a braid to braid knot?

Jimmy Mathis
Jimmy Mathis
1 year ago

I fish the Sea of Cortez for billfish. Here, marlin bigger than 250# are rare; we generally catch more stripes and sails. My biggest is a 650# black but we catch so few big fish that we do not gear up for fish that big day to day. I am a “knot freak” and have spent years of testing the breaking strength of knots both on the water and on a jig which I built for that purpose. My issue is that, although I read every “knot test” I can find, those tests never test the braid-to-leader connection we use. First, I use 80# braid for mainline–300 yds. on most reels. After using 50# and 65#, I settled on 80# because the breaking strength of braid is much more inconsistent than mono. This gives me a bit more margin for error when those rare big fish come along and, as you will see below, the braid rarely gets in the water anyway and only then when there’s a lot of line out and line friction through the water adds to the needed increase in breaking strength. I then splice on a 50# mono top shot about 150 yds. long–the actual length varies by reel depending on how much the reel will hold on top of the braid. Since the splice knot will usually be the weakest point, I want to avoid the splice altogether when possible and this combination means that the splice does not come off the reel most of the time. But when it does with a bigger fish, I have 300 yds. of braid mainline as backup. This also results in a stretchy mono section which serves as a “shock” leader which helps prevent hook pulls. I know other fishermen who use this set up also, or variations thereof, and do not think it is all that unusual. But all the splice knot tests which I have read involve lighter braid to heavier leader which is the reverse of what we use. I have evolved over the years from Albrights, Improved Albrights, Bristols and Improved Bristols–now I’m using a 13 wrap FG knot finished with a Rizzuto. I would love to see a knot test for such a setup using the IGFA testing machine which, I’m sure, would be more accurate than my home-made rig which incorporates a spring scale. Thanks.

Thomas C. Berry
Thomas C. Berry
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Saw somthing you guys could produce and sell it was a coffee cup with nautical knots we need one with fishing knots

John Valles
John Valles
5 months ago
Reply to  Jimmy Mathis

Curious about two knots.

1. The nail knot splice for line to line (nail knot leader to main line and mainline to leader). With a tool (yes, a con is having to use a tool) it’s incredibly easy and quick to tie, so I’m curious how it is I’m the strength department.

2. Have you tested snelling a hook to mono or fluro? I’d be interested to see if it holds up to actual knots.

Doug Goar
Doug Goar
1 year ago

I have used the Red Phillips knot now for several years for both light and heavy braided lines joined to fluorocarbon leaders. I do modify the original knot by finishing it with 4 alternating half hitches in the braided line. I don’t think you have ever tested this knot.

Doug
Doug
1 year ago
Reply to  Doug Goar

Hay Luke, I’m still waiting for a response to my original post. Your credibility as an expert is on display.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

trilene knot for whatever

RICHARD FIORENTINO
RICHARD FIORENTINO
1 year ago

What is your method for a double drop loop knot? Can’t find it

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Check out the stren knot for braid-to-mono/fluoro.

Park Beeler
Park Beeler
1 year ago

I found your discussion of knots to be quite insufficient, in that you left out the “speed to tie”, “ease to tie”, and “applicable to all situations” factors in evaluating overall desirability.

The great Vic Dunaway taught me the elegance of the Unit Knot forty years ago, and since that day, I have NEVER had a Uni Knot fail even one time, in forty years of hard fishing. It is truly a ‘KNOT FOR EVERY SITUATION”, including Loop Knot situations (the only drawback being that it has to be re-tied after a fish, because it will tighten when more pressure is put on the line.) It will not cut mono, and is great for a short strand tied horizontally to a main line as a “stopper” for corks, beads, and swivels. It is easy and fast to tie, even in rolling seas, and equal to or better than every other knot, all things considered, in approaching 100% line strength, whether for mono, fluoro, or braid. It is especially good for attaching braid main line to fluorocarbon leaders when the braid is doubled and the leader is not, joined by UNI to UNI. Your analysis also overlooked one very, very important consideration….who manufactured the line? Every single manufacturer’s lines have different “coefficients of friction”, which is absolutely critical in determining the best knot! Some knots will slip for one line but not another, and this is especially true of braid!l Once again, I have not found any make of line that does not work well with the Uni Knot, and that cannot be said of all other knots.

For the average fisherman or the world record seeker, give me the Uni Knot over all others.

Colin Chaplin
Colin Chaplin
1 year ago

A suggestion the Mahseer Knot. Mahseer Knot

Mahseer knot

This knot orginated in India by fishermen trying to catch the Mahseer. This fish is reowned as the ultimate freshwater fish. It is said to be the hardest pound for pound fighting species on the planet. For this reason the knot that takes its name is one of the strongest knot around and if tied right will not let you when you need it.

RICHARD FIORENTINO
RICHARD FIORENTINO
1 year ago

Luke – A suggestion – Have a separate section on Site called KNOTS- put your favorite knots (By now we all know what they are) in Alpha order . It will make it easier when we want to brush up on knot tying. Thanks

Ben
Ben
1 year ago

Have you ever heard of a TN knot? It appears to be used to tie a leader to your terminal tackle. Just wondering how this faired in your testing

Jim Buck
Jim Buck
1 year ago

Will the FG and PR work with braid to mono leader when going from heavier braid 50-65 lb to lighter mono 20-30 lbs. The articles I’ve read about these knots seem to indicate these knots only work when going from lighter braid to heavier mono?

James Barron
James Barron
1 year ago

The improved clich (triline knot)(double clinch) is stronger than your 3rd rated clinch knot

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

The improved Clinch not and the Trilene knot are not the same thing. The improved Clinch takes a standard Clinch and and after running the tag end through the hole between the strands and the hook, it is then passed through the loop it just created. This does not give the knot any added break strength, it only gives a little added insurance against slippage, which, if tied correctly, is not a factor in the first place. The Trilene knot, on the other hand, takes a standard Clinch and adds a second wrap around the item being tied to. This adds significant strength as this is a high stress area on the line. While I am a big Trilene fan, I also use Ande and a few other brands. I have found the Trilene knot to be my go to knot for mono to terminal tackle. Correct tying is paramount, and that means using the right number of turns. That varies with brand and also diameter. You need to perform your own tests on the lines you like to use. Thinner line generally requires more turns. I am due to retest some things, a good winter afternoon activity, but generally a 15-20# leader to swivel will use 5 turns, 12# more like 6, 8-10# 7 turns, an 6# and under needing 8 turns…YMMV…

Chad Rizzo
Chad Rizzo
1 year ago

Luke,

Have you done any testing with a braid to fluorocarbon connections that are the same size? (Equal pound test or the braid been heavier than the leader).

If so what would be the best knots for that? Sometimes in yellowtail fishing you need to have a leader smaller than the mainline that you’re fishing when the fish get weary.

Thanks,

Chad

John McKroid
John McKroid
1 year ago

San Diego Jam is a bulkier knot, but when I have used it in conjunction with the Palomar, the Palomar always breaks first. I would like to see it included in your tests. Thanks.

Jason Sikes
Jason Sikes
1 year ago

The biggest thing I’ve learned is to pick a couple of good knots and then learn to tie them well. I’ve been using the Canoeman Loop knot for years now and have never had a failure because it’s so easy to tie. Conversely, I had failures with the Albright braid-to-leader knot until I learned how to consistently tie it. When I decided to start using the FG knot, I also had some failures until I learned to do the same, which is to take my time early on and get it right. Then repeat this until it becomes easier and quicker. Having a properly set drag I think most all of these knots will land fish consistently. Thanks for the information!

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago

Maybe you will test is future the following:
– braid to hook : palomar with double passes through first knot
– fluoro to hook: clinch knot with doubled line, uni with doubled line, your improved uni, the knot that shaw grigsby uses.

Anonymous
Anonymous
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

So when you are saying that improved uni is better than palomar it is actually better than doubled palomar

Thomas W German
Thomas W German
2 years ago

When using spoons or jig/plastics, I get more strikes with the Kreh loop knot than with any of the snugged up knots like the clinch. However, I find that, because the eye of the lure is moving against the leader that has passed through it, it chafes that line after so many casts. Whenever I have lost a lure due to a snag (or even a fish!), I have seen that the knot held. What parted was the single strand of line through the eye of the lure. This does not happen with a knot that is snugged tight against the lure’s eye. I plan to experiment with doubling the leader before tying the loop knot. This would have two strands of line, rather than one, through the eye. I’m wondering if you have tried this and what the results may have been.

Thomas W German
Thomas W German
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Luke, I’ve had it happen with 20 lb. Yuzuri fleuro and Berkley Vanish, also 20 lb.

William Wilson
William Wilson
2 years ago

Where does the blood knot fit into your test? Used to like e blood knot, but now the FG knot. People I fish with like the albright, and Alberto, but your test proves the FG to be superior. Test the FG vs the blood knot please.

Jeff
Jeff
2 years ago

North Shore of Massachusetts…
Uni knoutes brought me fish in excess of 40lbs

George
George
2 years ago

Luke, thank you for your work & presentations on knots. When I learned to fly fish in Colorado 50 some odd years ago I was taught the needle knot for connecting the leader to the fly line. This is similar to a nail knot but the leader exits the core of the fly line rather than coming off the outside edge of the fly line. This is an advantage when pulling the leader & fly line through the rod guides.

Also, I was taught to tie a fly onto the leader (or tippet) using a knot for which I don’t know the name. You pass the leader through the eye of the hook and tie a loose overhand slip knot in the tag end. You reach through the loop of the slip knot and pull out one side of the overhand knot to form a loop. This loop is then passed over the fly and the knot is cinched down on the head of the fly with the standing part of the leader going through the eye of the hook. We were fishing for pan sized trout using fairly light gear, probably #10 or #12 flies on 4 or 6 lb test leaders and involved a lot of finesse and sneaking up on the trout.

Both of these knots worked for us, but I wonder how they would fare in your tests.

Lee Snyder
Lee Snyder
2 years ago

Any easy versions of a drop loop? I have problems with tactile feel in my fingers and setup all of my leaders at home. The drop loop is a major challenge for me.

Jim
Jim
2 years ago

I have tried every knot listed here trying to join braid to a mono leader. All of them slip. I can’t pull with my teeth and both hands so a few are more difficult than others. I can cinch down using both hands and pull as tight as possible. Then if I pull on the mono and braid after trimming the mono has pulled out in 100% of these. Closest to staying was a double double uni knot.
I have been experimenting with:

Power Pro 20,25, 40 and 65 lb
KastKing braid – 20, 25, 40 and 65lb
KastKing 20, 30, 40, 80lb mono
Zebco 20, 25, 40 lb mono
Berkley 20lb Fluorocarbon

I improvised a bit. For lack of a defined name, I will call this the JR knot.
1: tie a spyder hitch loop on the braid
2: tie a spyder hitch loop on the mono.
3: Using the mono, I feed it through the loop in the braid and tie an improvised Bristol knot, but, before completely cinching up the knot
4: Feed the mono leader (if still on the spool make sure mono loop is large enough) through the mono loop (that is now sticking out of the knot back towards the direction of the mono)
5: cinch everything down tight.
Note: There is no mono tag and the braid tag has already been trimmed from the spyder hitch loop.

Using this combination, I can pull as hard as I want and haven’t pulled the mono out yet. The line will break on one side or the other before the knot fails.

Love you videos,
Jim

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

I really like what you’ve done here. Ive been using the “tie-fast” tool that ties the nail knot for the last several years. I fish salmon in Lake Michigan so these knots have been tested. I have not found a weakness due to the knot. Have you tested the nail knot?

anon
anon
2 years ago

“there is no such thing as a 100% knot…” Funny that people who don’t know how to tie a 100% knot will always say this! They’ll write arcticles and preach this all over the web. A 100% fishing knot actually has to be +100% in order to ensure the line breaks before the knot does. The problem with people who don’t know how to tie a +100% knot is that they don’t really understand what it takes to do it. They only “think” they understand the “physics” but really are ignorant of what actually needs to happen with the knot. Keep it up! You’re one of the many blind people trying to lead!

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

It’s a long reply and I don’t know if all will be displayed… but here goes.

It’s good that you’ve seen knots perform the way they did. What you missed is “why” the line broke, and you also failed to “recognize” that the knot you tied actually turned into a +100% knot. With the beliefs you have, you probably didn’t research it further, or maybe blamed it on bad line, damaged line, etc. This is something many people do when they see line break and in fact deniers will often tell you that if you see the line break before the knot, it’s bad line. Funny, I almost joined a forum just to rebutt a poster who was claiming all kinds of knowledge and experience about how 100% knots don’t exist. Unfortunately, that thread or site is gone now, and even Waybackmachine (Internet archive) doesn’t have it… but I did save the page because it irritated me so much. By the end of the thread, the denier/actor actually convinced the OP. Pitiful! Going by what the denier says, I own 30 spools of bad line, and I seem to keep purchasing more!

I will not disclose the name of the knot(s) that have the capability. What I will tell you is that there is a “family” of knots that will consistantly perform at +100%. You must discover which knot family I’m referring to yourself… AND, discover “how” to tie them. A palomar knot for example does not belong to a family of knots… it is a single knot, so you can eliminate single knots, like Palomar’s, Miller knots, etc, from your research. You can also eliminate any knot that requires going through the eyelet two or more times. The family of knots are common knots… it’s only “how” you tie them that will turn them into +100% knots.

As for the line. Nowadays, mono lines are manufactured “hard” in terms of “tensile psi” so the manufacture can claim good abrasion resistance. As such, it is tougher to tie +100% knots with modern lines. Tensile psi is what makes mono do what it does best and that is compression and expansion. If the tensile psi is too high, you will never tie a +100% knot because you cannot get the correct compression and expansion the knot requires to make it impenetrable to pressure (this is a big hint to the “why” of +100% knots). Take P-line for instance. While it’s a hard line, you can still tie +100% knots, but you won’t do it all the time. P-line has a tensile psi of 79000 – 152000. It does fall in the range that’ll work, so you can be successful, but it depends on the manufacture lot of the line that you happen to have in hand. Too hard, and it’ll fail more often than not, too soft and the line will cut instead of breaking. Now take the “old” Berkley Big Game line which has a tensile psi of 105000 on average, you can always tie a +100% knot in this line because the tensile psi is bascially perfect for what needs to be accomplished. However, the problem is that Berkley changed the formula with it’s new BBG line (the line available in stores now) and it’s tensile psi appears to be lower, making it too soft to consistantly attain +100% knots… it’ll often cut before breaking. There may also be other factors besides the psi, like chemical makeup and such. Of course, you can do it with many lines, but like P-line, you can’t depend on it. Right now the only place you can purchase the “old” BBG is on ebay. Also, as far as I know, and I’ve tested it, you cannot tie +100% knots in fluorocarbon line. Fluorocarbon is not extruded like mono, so it doesn’t have the same elasticity for compression and expansion. It’s too hard… besides, it can crack down the seam. Of course, the tests I did on fluoro were using the same knots I tested on mono. Perhaps there are knots that could turn flouro in +100%, but I highly doubt it.

I’ve tied +100% knots in 3 – 40lb test line. Note that not all line of the same vendor/type will achieve +100% breaking through it’s different pound test ratings. For instance, 6lb test Maxima green can achieve +100% consistently while it’s bigger 20lb brother is very inconsistent. Same goes for Berkley Big Game (new), Suffix, P-Line, Stren, Jinkai, Ande… all inconsistent. But, the old BBG is awesome for attaining +100% knots… it’s my go to line for the type fishing I do, which is “whipping” in Hawaii. One of the best lines (also unavailable now) is Kingline. I don’t know the psi rating but I’ve tied +100% in 20 and 40lb test mono. Kingline has a smaller diameter per pound test than other lines… 40lb test is approx the diameter of 27lb test in other lines. Also note that Japan lines used to be labeled at the line breaking strength, so 40lb test is actually the breaking strength and not the strength as how US manufactured spools are labeled. Still, “steathwise” with it being clear (light blue) and smaller in diameter, Kingline is (was) a very good line. It breaks at about 38+lbs from my tests. Amazingly, I still have some 20 and 40lb test that I use today.

By the way, I use Sufix 832 braid line in 20 and 30lb test as my main line so I also had to develop a braid knot that could withstand the pressure of breaking the mono it’s tied to. No use having a +100% mono knot if your braid knot will fail before that. I developed a modified PR knot tied to ensure it can handle the pressure of a “slow pull” break. This means that when you pull on the line slowly, the braid knot will not fail before the mono fails, thus giving you all possible line strength of the mono leader. The braid knot will also not cut the mono line… this is just as important as the braid knot not breaking or cutting itself. If you fish where I fish (over reefs) with lures that cost $10 to $25 a shot, you would want to attempt to pull the hook out of the coral, or bend the hook to recover the lure. You would be pulling on the line slowly to accomplish this… thus the braid knot needs to pass the slow pull pressure requirements of full mono strength. There is no such thing as a +100% braid knot due to braid characteristics, but it’s not required if you can tie a knot that “acts” like it’s +100%.

Then again, while +100% knots are very nice, they aren’t really needed to catch fish. Fish are weaker than people believe… but then that’s another subject, isn’t it?

Lastly, people will wonder and query why I don’t disclose the knots. The reason is simple… because there are just too many distractors that simply won’t believe it no matter what. It’s easier to believe there are no 100% knots rather than try to do research themselves. You yourself have seen line break. Was it a fluke? Was/is there something to it? Didn’t you see it more than once to make you wonder? Just reading your article makes me believe you’re an intelligent person. I also believe that if you research and think about what needs to happen, and what knot you saw it happen with, you will discover the secret. Recognizing an occurrance of what the world says is impossible is very easy to miss. It’s almost like it’s easier to believe what you read rather than “really looking” into what just happened.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

I’m sure there are other people who have discovered how to tie +100% mono knots, and like me, are not disclosing it for various reasons. It is, after all, the “Holy Grail” of fishing. A few years ago, I had planned to release a document (or webpage) about my findings, and although I started it, I never completed it. I also thought about speaking to line manufactures to see if they would invest in experimentation to develop line that would enable +100% knots to be easily tied in their line. Can you imagine the competitive ramifications and profitability if one manufacture had this knowledge? Perhaps one day… but until I finally decide what path to follow, I have to apologize that I can’t disclose the knot(s).

My research actually started in 2011 and lasted approx 1.5 years. During that time I tied approx 12,000 knots, both mono and braid. I tied practically every mono and braid knot known at the time, to include variations of many knots. But to be honest, I didn’t tie knots I knew had no chance of attaining +100% because at some point during my testing I came to realize what needed to be accomplished so I was readily able to throw knots out just by looking at them. To date I’ve probably tied well over 16,000 knots to both reassert and verify my setup through the years, and sometimes, just for the fun of breaking mono line! Lol, I do waste a ton of line just playing!

In Oct 2015, I came back from vacation and realized I had forgotten how to tie my braid knot. So I sat down one weekend and tied approx 1000 knots. I kept all braid knots to later dissect and investigate how they were doing, and after counting them, I had approx 500 braid knots… which meant I had tied 500 +100% mono knots to break against just to relearn/verify my braid knot again. Directly after that round of knots, I created a document so I would never forget it again!

In additional testing I also tied 4 full setups and hung them untouched for over a year behind a door in my room to see what “time” would do to the knots. For sure, I thought at least the mono knot would fail, but to my surprise, all setups still broke the mono between the knots. I also tested full setups soaked in water overnight (+8 hrs) to see what effect that would have. While the mono did get softer and stretched more than when dry, the mono still broke between the knots. The hanging setups were done to try to determine if I could tie spare mono leaders and keep them in my tackle bag so I wouldn’t have to tie them at the beach. As it is, I have some spares sitting in my bag that are over 2 years old. I haven’t tested any of them yet, but perhaps I will one day. The water tests were done to determine how the knots would fare being soaked while fishing.

That’s the kind of testing I did. Unfortunately, for the last 2.5 years, I haven’t done any fishing at all because I’m a full-time caregiver for my Mom. But, after reading your article, I started wasting line again!

Per my testing there is no braid knot besides a modified PR knot that can break mono. Even with modifications and variations, I haven’t been able to stop any other braid knot from slipping, cutting itself, cutting the mono, or simply breaking. All other braid knots fail when applying “breaking” force, and they normally fail well below the strength of the mono. A note here regarding the lines I use… I use 25lb test BBG mono (old version) with 20lb test Sufix 832 braid (Low-vis Green), and 30lb test BBG mono (old version) with 30lb test Sufix 832 braid (Lo-vis Green). I also use 40lb Kingline mono with 30lb test Sufix 832 braid (Lo-vis Green). If fishing light tackle, I use 6lb test Maxima Green main line to swivel, and then 3lb test Hope (Japanese mono) leader to hook. If you want to learn more on breaking strengths of some mono’s and braids, visit Paulus’ website here… http://www.paulusjustfishing.com/4linetesting.htm

My take on braid… Braid line always moves inside the knot under pressure. The higher the pressure, the more movement inside the knot, and the deeper that movement attempts to go through the knot. This is unavoidable because braid has no means of gripping itself or any line it’s tied to. Also, the smaller or shorter the knot, the weaker the knot is, and the sooner it’ll fail. To tie the strongest braid knot possible, you need to ensure that although the braid is moving inside, it can maintain strength “while moving”. My own modified PR knot is designed for the braid to internally move without damaging the mono it’s tied to or to itself. If it doesn’t move enough, it would damage the braid. If it moved too much, it would cut the mono. I’ve seen that happen many, many times during development of my knot.

Here’s a test you can do if you’re able to tie PR knots. I identify this method of tying as a “close wrap” PR knot. Go here and watch this video…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbhvZi0fiM4

Then, tie the knot as closely as you can to match the knot. Use 20 or 30lb braid, and 20 or 30lb mono… match the mono and braid tests. After you tie the knot, try to break the setup (pull the braid and mono in opposite directions) and see what breaks. What will break is the braid knot, and not only will it break, but it’ll break within approx .5 inch from the top of the knot (reel side). The reason it breaks where it does is because pressure cannot move through the full length of the knot… because the “under” windings are too close. Full pressure (and heat) builds up only at the top section of the knot and causes the braid itself to fail.

After that test, go and watch this video…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u99KSrXdpu4

This PR knot is way too loose to be of any good. The “under” wrappings are way too few, too loose, and too far between. If you tie a PR knot in this manner, it will almost certainly cut the mono at the “turnaround”. The “turnaround” is the point where the braid starts overwrapping back up the line.

Sorry for getting off-topic, but braid knots that can act like +100% are integral to +100% mono rigs.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

I understand what you mean. However, the power of marketing, word of mouth, articles, and of course Youtube, would convince even those who already believe their knots are 100%. Just one knot challenge would fly across the world in record time, and follow up videos won’t be far behind… so people will look into it, no matter what. Fishing is vast and such advances like braid vs mono with it being thinner, lighter, and stronger per diameter made a big change in the market, as did changes in reels becoming smaller with improved drags to take advantage of braid line. And of course there’s the fluoro phenom, although I don’t use it. I truly believe people would invest in new lines if they see and experience something real and easily obtainable. Even I would… and I believe you would too! Right now my motivation for using +100% setups has nothing at all to do with catching fish, so this is where the separation lies for me.

Agreed, there are many knots claiming 100% in videos, etc… I’ve seen them too. However, because I can recognize what’s needed for the setup to accomplish +100%, I tend to discount the knots themselves in those claims, regardless of the line used. People will always believe what they want, and some will believe what they’re told, and they’ll do it without testing or experimentation, which I find sad. Anyone who thinks a Palomar knot can become +100% is misinformed. The knot simply doesn’t have the mechanism to do so… it slips until it cuts.

Your reasoning is not off-base, per-se… just a bit narrow, perhaps. I don’t know what kind of experimentation you did in attempting to achieve 100% knots before you gave up and concluded they don’t exist. From my findings, the line used is very important, too hard or too soft and they fail… within range, they work. Using a knot(s) with line that falls within range and achieving +100% means the knot(s) used is capable of tying to +100%. There’s no denying it. To say such a knot doesn’t exist and is a myth is wrong or I wouldn’t be able to do it. Now if your article was more specific to line type, manufacture, etc as data to your conclusion, then it would hold more credence. Of course, not knowing +100% knots exist in the first place, you wouldn’t go so far as to test different lines, types, manufactures, so you tested with line you had on hand, and since none worked, you concluded a 100% knot must not exist. Beyond that, your reasoning for why they’re a myth was based on the same assumptions seen all over the web. You may have reached those assumptions through your own testing, or maybe justified your findings by following along with the logic other people had… because it made sense to you since you didn’t figure it out yourself.

Here’s some of what you wrote, and variations of these statements are seen in all explanations I’ve read as to why 100% knots don’t exist. All statements are simply “assumptions”…

“a knot will always create a weak point on the line”
“contorting line and creating hard turns” … “will
always create a weak point in the line”.

Here is a snipit from that forum capture I did…

“always break at the first sharp turn on the knot”
“to tie a knot you have to bend the line and the bend itself weakens the line”

These statements imply that pressure on the line “will always” enter a knot. The statements are only true for knots that are NOT +100%. In cases where people have seen knots break line (discounting bad line), they are certainly false assumptions. Keep in mind that in a +100% knot, pressure can’t even get inside the knot, as if it could, then the line in the knot would get damaged leading to knot failure. This is of utmost importance as to why +100% knots don’t break. So, no matter how many bends, turns or contortions there are in the knot, the knot won’t fail if pressure can never get into it. Basically, a +100% knot turns into a block of mono with line sticking out of it. In your quest for tying a +100% knot, you must find how to tie this block of mono… and hopefully, repeatedly.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

The knots are common knots. Nothing added, no daisy chains, no series of knots, hitching or anything. It’s just the knots, and of course line with good characteristics.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Lol, you’re close but way off! Does that even make sense? 😉

I sent an email to your site. Unfortunately not to disclose anything about the knot, but rather some info on line. I hope you find it helpful in some manner. One of these days I may have to finish that write-up I started. It’s been nice conversing with you, Luke. Keep that open mind! Tight lines!

Ben
Ben
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Bimini main line then GT knot to leader, IGFA claims 100% connection. The bimini to Fg comes second w 95%(?) but the line should be 50# and above leader 80#. ON the lower line class, PR bobbin knot, 80%. THese knots where submitted by FIShermen and the winner won a reel?
ANYway, I will try them next month offshore. tiGHt lines

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

A+++ GREAT article guys Now I know what knots to stick with.

Jared Martin
Jared Martin
2 years ago

I’d love to see a comparison between the FG and the RP knot.

fabivsum
fabivsum
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Hi Luke: Depending on which part of the country one lives in, a single knot can have many names. Re the “Alberto” knot you reference, other names include the Modified Albright/RP/John Collins/Improved Bristol. They’re identical knots with the only variance being number of wraps up/down (usually 5-7).

Chris Moss
Chris Moss
2 years ago

Great article, anyway to make this a quick reference guide so when I’m out on the water I know what’s knots to use in which situation?

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris Moss

Chris…just hit share and send to your email, I then put the article in my “Fishing Folder”, just refer to it when needed.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

line doubling knots : aussie plait or australian braid

David Atkins
David Atkins
2 years ago

Hey, thought I would reach out and ask about what I’ve heard called the “Jimmy Houston Knot”, its on utube and I’ve watched Jimmy tie it several times. I have tried it and my line breaks before the knot does, Jimmy says it is a 100% knot and the only one he has ever seen. Good for any line type, can you check it out and get back to me?

Henry Davis
Henry Davis
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Jimmy Houston Knot

I watched him tie it several times. It’s not terribly complicated. Tried it in 20# and 30#, then looked up every video and description I could find. I’m tying it right; it is not 100%.

Tested my best wrap of this knot in 30# copoly (10 tries) and 60# (5 tries) in fluorocarbon. Used steady increasing force to break it. Every time it broke where the main backbone went into the coils. Not somewhere in the backbone, but at the knot, where the backbone entered the coils. Yes, the knot was still on the eye, but sometimes the knot had a double wrap of line still around the eye and sometimes only one leg still holding the knot on.

In every case, the knot failed before the main line did. Too be fair, it is a solid knot, not hard to tie if you are not slowed by arthritis as I am, a kind of inverted improved clinch knot that performs way better than the improved clinch knot or even the Trilene knot, but not any better than a double double Palomar or a well tied multi coil uni knot. And it is cinch only, not a loop or anything I’d try using to tie line to line….

I’m thinking the people touting this knot are not examining the remains of the knots after breakage beyond noting the knot is still attached. The one leg gone on the doubled through the eye portion is a serious clue, but dissecting the knots that had both loops around the eye intact show the backbone broke at or just below the first coil at the top of the knot. It may be that stronger line caused recoil to push the broken end in to the eye and all the ones proponents examined had both loops intact around the eye. Used larger sizes so I could actually examine the insides of the knot with bright light and cut away parts during the necropsy to see the break.

It will keep a hook or plug on a line pretty good, but by definition is is not 100% of line strength.

My theory is increased constriction on the backbone (main or standing line) by the coils causes it to narrow the circumference and thus weaken it so it is what gives first.

I’ve never seen a 100% line strength knot in less than 400# test mono. (And almost no practical knot at or above that.) Not in half a century of looking. But I always stand ready to be amazed.

——Henry.

Steve Gustafson
Steve Gustafson
2 years ago

I’ve had great success tying mono to lures/hooks with a Jansik Special knot. Any thoughts?
Thanks for the great info.

Mike Cavanaugh
Mike Cavanaugh
2 years ago

Huge thanks for making it simple. I’ve cought a lot of 20 lb Redfish on the Clinch knot. A few times it has unraveled but overall a great easy knot. Re-rigged all of my lines with the FG knot for braid to flouro and very impressed with the difference in diameter. Now will work on breaking another old habit and go with the polymer for hook connection. Thanks for all you do the lifetime of information u provide. Thankful I chose to be Salt Strong!

Joshua
Joshua
2 years ago

So I recently found a variation of the Orvis knot known as the Orvis Tippet knot. It’s used to join similar diameter mono lines together and I thought it might have a chance against the venerable Surgeon’s knot. I would love to see your results added here. https://news.orvis.com/fly-fishing/pro-tip-how-to-tie-the-orvis-tippet-knot

Earl
Earl
2 years ago

Hi Luke,
My name is Earl. l live in San Diego.
A popular knot used out here on the west coast is the RP ( Royal Polaris) knot. It is a strong knot for braid to mono or fluorocarbon line.
I would like to see the results of this knot compared to the FG knot.
THank you.

James Mills
James Mills
2 years ago

Old arthritic hands. any tips on swivels or clips that make lure change easier without hindering action or deterring fish.

Henry Davis
Henry Davis
2 years ago
Reply to  James Mills

Arthritic fingers – what knots?

I started fighting Arthur (Ankylosing spondylitis in hands and spine) at age 13. Symptoms started 45 years ago while growing up a commercial fisherman, so I have long sought to avoid tying knots in the field whenever possible. Tying much of my terminal tackle in a warm dry living room with table space, tools and jigs is how I mostly do it these days. The trick was coming up with a quick change that did not require complicated hand motions, repetition or heavy stress on fingers out in the cold and wet, but avoided snap swivels though I used those for years before developing this system.

Braid and fluorocarbon have complicated the process by requiring multiple modifications and newly adopted knots followed by testing those knots at the bench and in the field and finding what works.

The last couple decades I have only recreationally fished with artificials, but my prior experience rigging commercial equipment provided some background in adaption and materials testing that was useful. [I built and designed nets, traps (lobster and fish), longline gear, harpoon rigs and more, then tested them against some of the toughest customers to be found it the water.]

For inshore light tackle ( 7 ft one piece Berkeley Lightning rods, 2500 series reels, 15-20 lb braid, 20-30 lb copolymer leader, flukes, paddletail jigs, bucktails, whopper ploppers, woodchoppers, spinner rigs, etc.) I use a system to avoid tying much of anything in the field. Start with extra matching rod reel combos so you first just change rods in and out of a rod holder rack.

Then tie leaders longer than you need to repair bite offs and breaks on structure without having to tie new leader to the braid. Use a good braid to leader knot you can successfully tie over and over. I’ve used double uni, slim beauty, multi wrapped Surgeon’s knots, but prefer by far the Chinese finger cuff knot or FG knot finished with a uni knot instead of half hitches. Break offs almost always happen at the leader, or a nick in the braid, but rarely at the FG knot when properly tied. I’ve snapped several earlier rods at the reel seat inside my hand before the braid or leader before using Lightning rods. ( I tried St. Croix rods but not any better IMHO.)

The key to the quick field changes of lures works this way. I tie a 3-4 inch loop in the end of the leader. Then I have a stub leader tied with a loop or modified Palomar to the jig or other lure terminating 5-6 inches out with a 2-4 inch loop. Loop to loop knot the leader to the stub leader. NOTE: Be sure NOT to make a GIRTH HITCH. Slide the stub loop over the leader loop, bring the jig up through the leader loop and pull the stub leader all the way out by the jig.

The Loop to loop forms a square knot between the two loops. The tag ends are secured by the loop knots so the knot cannot capsize. However if you push the two loops toward each other, one in each hand, the loop to loop can be untied. Even serious strain does not lock it. I’ve lifted a commercial crab trap with one and still untied the loop to loop. You can change lures in a few seconds. If the stub leaders tangle, they’re easily untangled or can be isolated by using sandwich sized zip locks to store them in the tackle box.

Depending on the eye of the lure, a stub leader is not always necessary, but to get the right action sometimes they are essential. Any well performing loop knot you can regularly tie should work if strong and stable. I use perfection knots with extra wraps all the way around with the tag end between the first two loops that form the perfection loop by tucking one through the other. This prevents the copolymer from slipping. Works for pure fluorocarbon too.

You tie the leaders and FG knots at home at your own pace, stopping whenever you need to stop.

In the wind and rain you only have to manage one or two loops. Beats tying on every lure you use. Tested it in the wild against straight leader same lure. Caught same on both rigs. I never saw a fish flare from the loops. Can’t say the same for swivels and clips.

——-Henry.

James Mills
James Mills
2 years ago
Reply to  Henry Davis

WOW Henry! Now I have arthritis of the brain. Gonna take me a while to digest and practice your advice. Appreciate the detail and rationale. More to your post than the loop knot, you are a rich source of experience and know how.
Thanks for the info.
Jim

Henry Davis
Henry Davis
2 years ago
Reply to  James Mills

Hope it helps and contact me if you run into any problems implementing it. I used it all day today casting everything in my box for this time of year here at points, rips, and marsh islands. Nasty low pressure rainstorm showed up toward evening so I would have had to go in or stop changing lures. Fish already being wet, rain only removes top water and much chance at snakeheads. So I pulled on the duck hunting parka and kept casting for 2 more hours before limping home and cranking up the electric throw on my recliner.

Only knot I tied all day, not to a dock cleat, was a perfection loop when I shortened a leader to avoid wind knots from the stiffening breeze. Hands throbbing like someone beat them with an axe handle but I fished all day. Beats desk duty or any chore I’ll be doing tomorrow.

——Henry.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

Blood knot

Troy
Troy
2 years ago

For tying braid, mono or fluorocarbon directly to a hook, I use the traditional Snell knot. It’s never slipped on me, what a knot!! Give it a go

Tom Hoadley
Tom Hoadley
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

The Snell knot also gives us Texas rigged bass guys the “kick” at hook set. Grab the weight, pull the line, and watch what happens. I land twice as many using the Snell on a Texas rig than say a Palomar that pulls out of their mouths but you have to feed the line from the front when tying.

Stephen Akre
Stephen Akre
2 years ago

Luke I recently respooled with 10# spider wire ultra cast braid and my fg knots don’t seem to hold…any thoughts?.. .I seem to get a little more distance with this braid but the coating may be a problem. Up north with nanofil I have to double the braid loop with my double uni knots but tying the fg with a doubled ultra cast does not seem to be the answer…thanks

jesse mcdonald
jesse mcdonald
2 years ago
Reply to  Stephen Akre

The fg knot is a great knot. When im using a slippery style of braid (such as what you are using) i rub some sand paper or a sharpening stone on the area of your leader where the FG knot will clinch down onto. This will give the braid a textured surface to help stay in position. Also make sure you tighten the knot so that it clinches down / bites onto your leader martial. Good luck

Stephen Akre
Stephen Akre
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Either 20 or 30 depending on the situation. I was using seguar blue, tried seguar premium and now a softer advance…same results

Stephen Akre
Stephen Akre
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Will do. I did try up to 30 wraps without success. May just have to respool with power pro

David Tillemans
David Tillemans
2 years ago
Reply to  Stephen Akre

Try tying the half hitches at the end of the fg knot good and tight before pulling to set the knot.

Kenny
Kenny
2 years ago

For joining braid to braid could two bimini doubles be used like a wind on leader. Would like to see it tested.

John McGinty
John McGinty
2 years ago

I think you will post some info in the future on fly lines but any thoughts on something easy for fly line to leader? Would you do two Surgeon’s loops for a loop to loop connection?
You provide great info on your site. Really appreciate it.
John

brandon
brandon
2 years ago

for mono to hook, do you think palomar reigns supreme over snelling?

Brian
Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  Luke Simonds

Have you done a test between the snell knot and Palomar? Im concerned about knot strength more than anything. Thanks.

Brent
Brent
2 years ago

What about the Red Philips knot for braid to fluro?

Anonymous
Anonymous
2 years ago

Is the San Diego jam knot strong to tie jigs using floro. I mainly fish walleye in Ontario.
Thanks.

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