Best Fishing Knot for Braided Line to Swivel, Hook, or Lure

By: Luke Simonds on February 5, 2015
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Uni Knot with Braided Line

Wondering what the best fishing knot for braided Line to wwivel, hook, or lure connection is?

Well you came to the right place.

Because the most common problem facing anglers who use braided line is that many fishing knots that are strong with mono are not nearly as good when used with braid given the vast differences in the two line types.

Since this connection is so vital, we decided to perform a test that matched the most popular knots against one another to determine which one truly is the best fishing knot for braided line to a swivel, hook, or lure.

Here are the knots that we started out with in this analysis:

  • Uni Knot (improved for braid)
  • Palomar Knot
  • Improved Clinch Knot
  • San Diego Jam Knot

Note: This test is specific only to tying braided line to a swivel, hook, or lure. We personally recommend connecting your braided line directly to a fluorocarbon leader which then connecting to your hook/lure in most situations.

Uni Knot (Improved for Braided Line)

The ‘Uni Knot’ is one of the most popular knots for fishing, so it was a given that we’d include it in this test. The only question was how to alter the standard Uni for best results with braid. After some tests, we found that going through the eye twice and then using 10 turns (or more) generated the strongest results. Watch the video below to see exactly how to best tie the Uni Knot for braided line.

Note: Strength results are shown below.

Palomar Knot

The ‘Palomar Knot’ probably has the most fans of them all. It’s easy to understand why given its simplicity to tie and its impressive strength. However, most of the analysis of it is using mono line, so we decided to include it here to see how it does with braid.

Note: Strength results are shown below.

Improved Clinch Knot

The ‘Improved Clinch Knot’ is another very popular knot which has great online reviews. However, like the Palomar, most of the knot reviews involve using it on mono.

So we decided to test out multiple variations to see if it can be trusted with braided line.

The best we could find was a doubling of the braid through the hook eye and 10 wraps around the main line with the braid, but even that couldn’t compete with the others due to slipping out.

Given its low performance and relative difficulty to tie, I recommend not using this one so did not include a how-to video.

San Diego Jam Knot

This is a knot that I was completely unfamiliar with when starting this analysis.

It proved to be a very good option, but I found that it was tough to get consistent results with it and it took a bit longer to tie than the Braid Uni (which happens to be stronger than the Jam knot too), so I’ll stick with the Uni going forward.

Below is the best way I found to tie the San Diego Jam with braid in case you’re curious:

Note: Strength results are shown below.

Conlusion – Braid to Swivel/Hook

This analysis was very close for the Uni knot and the San Diego Jam.

Given the slightly stronger hold of the Uni knot along with the fact that it’s a bit easier to tie, I recommend the Uni for this connection.

Also, please note that adding more wraps (above 10) make it even stronger… 14 is what I now use when tying this knot.

An interesting finding from the series of fishing knot contests we preformed has been that using a direct line-to-line knot is just as strong (and sometimes stronger) than using a swivel to connect the two lines.

Previously, I always thought that using a swivel was strongest because the two lines were not digging into each other.

However, the testing proved otherwise.

For example, the breaking strength of the winning knot in the braid to mono fishing knot contest was in the 20 – 23 lb range, and the winner of this test was basically the same (within 1 pound).

For this reason, I only use swivels when using baits/lure that are prone to twist line because line twists can weaken the line and significantly increase to likelihood of getting wind knots.

Braid to Hook Fishing Knot Contest

This diagram shows the head to head matches that took place as part of this analysis. The test consisted on 3 rounds… 3rd round was the winning knot tied against itself to test its strength. The red values below the names of the knots represents the amount of pull strength that the knots where able to withstand in each round. Lines used were 10 lb PowerPro braid and 30 lb Ande Fluorocarbon.

This knot testing is continuous… we’re always seeking out better styles/methods, and we’ll of course update this page as new/better knots come to light.

If you have a great leader to hook/lure knot that is not included here, please leave a comment below about it (or send us an email – fish@saltstrong.com). We’ll include it in our testing and let you know how it compares to the others.

Best Fishing Knots Of All Time (Ranked Strongest To Weakest)

 

Don’t let the biggest fish of the day get off with your lure/hook!

Check out the post linked below which shows the rankings of the best knots of all time.

Best Fishing Knots Of All Time (Ranked Strongest To Weakest)

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Vaughn HatleyR RobersonLuke SimondsTim HadfieldJohn E Recent comment authors
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R Roberson
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R Roberson

Hi. I find the figure 8 knot making 4 turns instead of 2 , easy to tie on the beach and quite strong.Had my main line part or cut of every time before the figure 8 parted. Of course I have never run comparison test. If you have a chance to try. Thanks.

Tim Hadfield
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Tim Hadfield

You say the double uni knot goes back to 1990 – well my father taught it to me (I am over 70), and his father taught it to him, so it goes back a long way before 1990.

Vaughn Hatley
Member

Yep, you are so right, Sir!

William DeWeese
Member

Curious. Did any of the break tests include a loop knot looped around the top eye of the swivel? I was curious if looping it would result in a break at the loop or break at a weaker level than the original expectations of the base knot.

Ben Gagne
Guest
Ben Gagne

Hi Luke i Read all comment Bellow and it very enterresting now did you try tying the uni knot the same way of the double double uni knot what i meen is double the line and than pass it through the hook eye will this reduce the tension on the line entering the knot.

Rafik
Guest
Rafik

trilene knot with 3-4 turns around the eye and 13-15 turns around the line always beats your Uni Knot (Improved for Braided Line) in all tests

Carl
Guest
Carl

i just tried this. it looks and feels like it will do me well. how have you tested this knot?

Rafik
Guest
Rafik

trilene knot with 2 turns around the eye and 13-15 turns around the line always beats your Uni Knot (Improved for Braided Line) in all tests

Felix peckinpaugh Peckinpaugh
Member

i have bad tremer in my hands’ what size swivel should i use? also whats the lightest 7 ft rods to use?

Kingsalmon
Guest
Kingsalmon

Star Rod Stellar Lite, or Redbone Inshore.

Julian
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Julian

For the improved uni knot for braid, do the 2 loops going through the eye need to point in the same direction (make sure they don’t overlap)? Thanks.

Rick L Aka The Fish-N-Fool
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Rick L Aka The Fish-N-Fool

I just saw that you stole my knot by calling a braid uni knot not the Fish-N-Fool knot and didnt give any credit for it once again. Once might of been an over sight but twice after I call you on it, now we all know what you are.

Ian
Guest
Ian

Hi Rick, This knot is also known in the UK as a grinner knot, I have a book which details the tying of it using twice through the eye that was published in 1990. If you search for animated knots and look for the uni knot, or Duncan Uni knot you can verify the name at least. I’m quite willing to offer the books details with images if required and can probably find an older book which details its use before this date.

New knots are few and far between, since most are just a minor modification of an existing one, or just another name for it.

These videos are really good resource.

John E
Guest
John E

I know this is a long time ago post but seriously? You’re trying to claim ownership of a knot that’s been tied for decades. I don’t know about you’re fishing ability but you’ve proven yourself to be a total fool.

Kyle Malmstrom
Guest
Kyle Malmstrom

The reason the author is having difficultly with getting consistent results with the SD Jam Knot is because he isn’t using a good and consistent technique to tie it. I would freak out tying it the way he is tying it.

The key to tying the SD knot it to keep tension on the line at all times during the process of tying the know.

Set up : You must have someplace to secure your hook – like the guide of your rod! And you must have your reel locked while you tie the knot. These two factors allow you to keep the knot tight while your tie it.
If you find you have too little/too much line, you can move up and down a guide on the rod to make quick adjustments

Get the right amount of line out, lock your reel and then take your tag end and thread the hook eye. Must sure you have a good 10 to 14 inches of line to work with (if you skimp on line here, you will get frustrated).

Now, with it tight come up and over over your index finger (left finger if you are right handed), then make your seven wraps. Use your index finger to keep the line tight!! Pull up on your finger! If this is done correctly and everything is tight, this keeps the down line (to the hookeye) and the up line (to your index finger) parallel and not spinning over each other. After your seven wraps, go though the loop next to the the hook eye. Now cinch the wraps up towards your index finger so that all the wraps are tight against one another like a little barrel of 7 wraps, none of them should be overlapping. It should like very uniform, tight, and well tied at this point. Again, use your index finger to keep this know tight!! Now make one wrap around the barrel of lines and end it by going through the loop that your index finger created (note: at this point you will slip the tip of your index finger out, making that loop. Sometimes it is tough to get off because you have the loop too far close to your first knuckle). Put some spit on the barrel and down lines, and snug it up by pulling the line coming from your reel and not the tag. Once it is down on the hookeye, then you can give the tag end a pull. Trim with 1/16″ of the tag end out (not too close). This is not a knot for stealth, it is a knot for strength. I do not tie it on any line under 10 lb test (preferably 15 – 40 lb). If any part of the knot doesn’t look right and overlaps another wrap, it is NOT right -redo it. This knot will come out perfectly uniform every time once you figure out how to keep it tight. Everytime. It is a fun knot to tie (if you keep it tight) and is as close to a 100% knot as you will find.

Tight lines (especially tying this knot)
Kyle

Andrew
Guest
Andrew

I’ve been learning new knots lately, to deal with changes in line (flouro), and have been loving the “world’s fair exhibition knot” attributed to Gary Martin. I do not think I have ever seen a simpler knot and so far it holds in all types of line pretty well!!

Tom Mangus
Member

Another great set of videos. I’ve been using a modified palomar for a long time. I run the double line through the eye 2x and also 2x for the knot like a double sugeon’s knot and it seems to work very well. Never had the equipment to test it but I’d be curious to see it makes a difference. Thanks for all the great info you guys put out there.

Keith French
Member

Dang, excellent info, I have primarily used the palamar knot on my carolina rigs for surf fishing, the only difference and a question is that I run the doubled line twice thru the swivel and then finish the knot, would running the line thru twice make the knot any stronger ?

Matt
Guest
Matt

great info – it would also be helpful to know the relative knot strength to the line. For example, test the breaking strength of the line – lets say the line breaks at 20lbs. The same line with a uni knot breaks at 15lbs – the relative knot strength is 75%.

Jan
Guest
Jan

Two questions on your modified uni:1. Does the second pass through the hook’s eye form a half-hitch (what you refer to as an overhand knot) or not?  I wonder if adding that element would help resist slippage even more – slippage seems to be the major concern with knotting braid.2.  Do your “failure” loads usually result in the knot slipping or the line breaking?  If you find that 14 turns are better than merely 10 turns in the uni, I assume the failure of the “10 turn knot” is due to slippage – it would be interesting to know what the difference is between the two (10 versus14) in failure load.As an aside, I see lots of folk using a drop of super glue to finish a knot on braid.  Do you have any comparisons on “glued” versus “not glued” knots of the same construction?  Might it be more of an esthetic choice that one based on strength? Thanks.  I find your videos to be clear and well-paced.

Luke Simonds
Member

Interesting alteration on the” UNI” definitely my favorite knot in all situations.