Top 5 Myths About “No Bananas on Board” Your Fishing Boat

By: Joseph Simonds on January 2, 2015
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no bananas on board

Why are fishermen so superstitious about making sure there are NO Bananas on board their boat while fishing???

I did some serious research on this banana fishing myth, interviewed anglers, and even put bananas on our own boat to test out this theory.

It turns out that “bad luck bananas on boats” is one of the oldest, longest running, and controversial fishing and boating superstition out there.

Some boaters and anglers swear by “bad luck bananas on board,” while others laugh at the superstition…

Note: You will be blown away below when you hear what happened on our fishing trip when there was an actual banana on board our boat…

But first, let’s cover the facts about fishing superstitions and bananas on board fishing vessels.

Fact: The more serious you are about fishing, the more superstitious you become…

I would even argue that fishermen and fisherwomen are perhaps the most superstitious group in America (besides the guy I see in the 7-11 convenient store that sits down on the ground Indian style every day as he scratches off his lotto tickets. Apparently he won $1,000 while sitting down Indian style with his legs crossed one time, and he thinks he must do it every time from now on to summon the good look fairy).

But anywho…some of the craziest superstitions (always masked as reasons that the fish aren’t biting on your boat) seem to arise from anglers.

Related Post: “Are Bananas Really Bad Luck On Boats? [PICS & TRUE STORIES]!” (see it here now)

no bananas on board

A palm reader giving a sailor his future on a boat filled with bananas

Here are just a few funny fishing superstitions:

1) Whistling on a boat causes extreme bad luck for the entire boat

2) You can only enter the boat from a certain side or the entire day of fishing will be ruined

3) And the topic of this blog… that having Bananas on board your boat while fishing causes everything from motor failure, no fish, and a wild list of other detriments that you will hear about shortly (this “bananas cause bad luck fishing” theory has some anglers so superstitious about bananas on board that they won’t even allow Banana Boat sunscreen on board)

“No Bananas On Board!”

Let me tell you my own true story of what happened the one (and only) time that we “accidentally allowed” a banana on board our boat down in Florida.

It started off as a perfect summer morning in Marco Island, Florida back in 2000. We were down there with our incredible friends the Bentley Family, and the trip had been fantastic so far (mostly inshore fishing for snook and redfish).

But today, we were headed offshore (going after big snook, cobia, and grouper) to a wreck that we heard from a trusted source was on fire!

Clear skies, only a 20% chance of rain (which is an incredibly low percentage for Florida in the summer), and we were riding in our dad’s 3-year old 21ft custom flats boat made by Release.

Note: One of us (many fingers still point angrily at me), had accidentally packed a banana on board the boat that day…

My dad, my brother Luke and I got an early start to catch some threadfin “greenback” bait fish as we were headed out about 20 miles to catch some lunkers.

no bananas on board

Joe, Papa Simo, Luke, the 21ft Release Boat, and a Banana on board…

After just a few casts with our 12-foot cast net, we had enough bait fish for a few boats. In fact, we actually threw back over 40 baitfish from the second cast because we had so many.

The live well was pumping salt water through a magnificent looking live well full of bait fish, we had a nice breeze, and we even had plenty of food and drinks (including a banana) to last us the entire day and then some.

“What a heck of a start,” we thought as we headed out on the 20-mile stretch.

What could go wrong?

The Offshore Trip from Marco Island

As we finally approached the wreck, we were very pleased to see that we had it all to ourselves… not a single boat within sight in all directions.

As we excitedly grabbed our rods to wet our lines, my dad lifts up the live well hatch (with scoop net in hand), and grunts, “What in the world happened…?

Nothing could have prepared him for what he saw…

The live well was full of dead fish.

Over a hundred of them.

The water in the live well was there, but not a single baitfish was still alive from our 20-mile journey southwest… turns out that the intake got clogged and no new water was pumped in during the long trip out.

So there we were, 20-miles out in a flats boat with nothing but dead fish in our livewell… a ruined day, three ticked off fishermen, and a banana.

But the story gets even worse…

After debating about how the live well could have failed on our trusted boat that had never had an issue before, we noticed that the floor of the center console was covered with a thin layer of water that usually wasn’t there unless packed with people (the floor of the boat sits just barely above the water line, and when enough weight is added to the boat, water can be pushed up the drain pipes into the walking area).

Given that it was only three of us without much gear, the only answer to that floorboard water is that a lot of water must have gotten into the hull of the boat… sure enough, we opened the hatch to the bottom hull and we had over 5 inches of water in there.

Typically, the float switch on the bilge pump would ensure this never happened, but it somehow didn’t get activated. We have a manual switch to turn on the bilge pump, but that didn’t turn it on either… the bilge pump is dead!

Five inches of water never seemed so scary

no bananas on board your boat

At this point, we faced a crisis.

I tell you, five inches of water never seemed so scary when you are out in boat 20 miles away from the closest shore, with shark infested waters all around, and no other boats anywhere in sight.

So we now had to cut open a Gatorade bottle to scoop out the water as fast as we could… hopefully, faster than it was coming in.

After about twenty minutes scooping, we realized that however, the water got in there, it wasn’t coming in very fast anymore because our scoops were able to cut the level down… water issue no longer a threat.

However, our focus on the boat took our attention away from the horizon to the north (our way back home) where a nasty storm was brewing. The kind that most of us Floridians love to admire from the comfort of our homes…

NOT

from the uncomfortable and exposed view on a 21ft flats boat on the open Gulf.

So we did what any sane fisherman would do…

We cut our losses for the day and gunned it back towards home while praying we could beat the storm.

Long story storm short…

Lightning Storm – 1

Team Simonds – 0

We got nailed by some of the thickest rain you have ever seen.

And of course, we had no serious rain gear as we didn’t anticipate any rain according to the weather forecast that day (we blame it on the banana).

The rain was so bad, and it was hitting us so hard, that we had to slow down.

But as much as the rain hurt us like hail hitting a car, it took a back seat to our fear of the lighting.

no bananas on board

Good old Florida Lightning at its finest

If you have ever been in the middle of a lightning storm, you know what I am talking about.

And if you don’t know what it is like to be exposed in a lighting storm, here is my best analogy…

Imagine three grown men screaming like little 10-year-old girls every time a big boom hit near us.

It was one after another… booms, bolts, and shrieks from the Simonds’ bros and father.

I dare say it was one of the scariest and most vulnerable moments of my life (besides my first prostate exam, but that is an entirely different story).

After the longest boat ride back home of our lives, we finally see the channel marker for Caxambus Pass (south side of Marco Island), the rain finally dies down, the lighting has almost gone away completely, and we cry like little girls again (in a joyous way that we survived).

The last few minutes into the idle zone to our dock were spent with the three of us wondering how everything had turned so negative so quickly.

After a few minutes of debate, my dad mentioned the banana that we had on board.

Could it be?

It was the only thing abnormal on our boat that was usually not there. And the banana certainly seemed like the only logical patsy for us to blame our misfortune on…

Fast forward to today…

My dad still has the same 21ft Release and we all use it often.

It has never had a banana on board since that day.

It has also never had any livewell or bilge pump issues again, even though the boat is 14 years older.

So call it what you will, but the Simonds will never forget that dreaded fishing trip where nothing went right.

And you can be certain that we have a strict “No Bananas On Board” policy on all of our boats since then.

Without further adieu…here are the top 5 reasons why bananas are bad luck on fishing boats…

Top 5 Myths about Bananas on Board Your Boat While Fishing

bad luck bananas on the boat fishing

The following “bad luck bananas on board boat myths” are in no particular order.

They are based on years of banana research and interviews with fishermen from all over the world who claim bananas are bad luck on fishing boats.

Enjoy.

 

#1 Reason To Have No Bananas On Board Your Boat While Fishing

Spiders.

no bananas on board

More specifically, crap-loads of spiders.

I grew up in a house in Winter Haven, FL that actually had three banana trees on one side of our home.

And do you know what could be found almost year round in and around those banana trees?

You guessed it, spiders.

For some reason, spiders love bananas.

And I can only imagine that back in the day when shiploads of bananas were being brought over from Africa, they were loaded with small spiders.

And do you know when spiders are most active?

At night.

So imagine this scene: the sailors carrying the banana cargo go to bed for the evening, they get bitten by these poisonous African spiders, and no one can figure out why the crew is dying (keep in mind that 1700s when this was occurring, they did not have cures for venomous spiders like we do today, especially not out at sea.)

When they finally arrive in their destination port with a big chunk of their crew dead, you can see just how easy a rumor could spread that bananas were bad luck on board.

#2 Reason To Have No Bananas On Board Your Boat While Fishing

“The Smoking Floating Gun – Bananas”

no bananas on board

The floating banana

Back in the 1700s and 1800s, there was no Coast Guard.

And there certainly wasn’t high-frequency radio, cell phones, or any other way to call in for help or distress.

So when a ship went down, it usually went down without anyone else knowing about it (except for the unlucky sailors on board).

Of course, other vessels that were passing through the same shipping channels found many of these shipwrecks.

Do you know what rises to the top of the water when a ship goes down?

Anything that floats of course…including bananas!

And when another ship came up to the spot that a ship had sunk, only to see a ton of bananas floating amongst the other debris, you can imagine how easy it would be to assume bananas were bad luck.

When the sailors that came across the sunken ship went back to port, you better believe every story that was shared made mention of the floating bananas.

Before you know it, that story gets passed on and elaborated upon until everyone in town believes that bananas caused the wreck.

As Gwen Stefani said, “It’s Bananas! B-A-N-A-N-A-S”

bananas bad luck fishing

Gwen Stefani “Hollaback Girl” Video (It’s Bananas)

#3 Reason To Have No Bananas On Board Your Boat While Fishing

Stinky Bananas…

no bananas on board

Have you ever left a banana at home while you went on a long vacation?

I recall one time that I went away for a little over two weeks and came home to a horrible smell in my kitchen.

I checked the trash cans, I checked the garbage disposal, and I checked to make sure my fridge hadn’t crashed and all of the food went bad while I was gone.

But it wasn’t any of these culprits that were causing the wretched smell in my house.

And then I saw it…

Almost blending into my black granite counter were two shriveled up, completely black, almost morphed together into one banana, rotten as can be, smelly bananas.

It smelled as if something had died in my kitchen.

And that smell was produced from only two bad bananas.

Can you imagine what hundreds or even 1,000 bad bananas would smell like?

Well, some sailors certainly did back in the 1700s.

How?

Let me explain.

When a ship left with a cargo full of bananas, speed was key.

The sailors knew that they only had so many days before the bananas would go bad, which meant their cargo would be worthless (thus they didn’t get paid).

But what it also meant that when a bad storm, huge waves, getting lost at night due to the captain falling asleep at the helm (aka passing out after too much rum), or a variety of other reasons that things don’t go as planned on the ocean, was that the bananas on board began putting off an odor.

And most people don’t know this, but the odor that bad bananas put out doesn’t just make your nose twitch, it also can kill other produce around it (the odor speeds up the time that other fresh food and produce goes bad).

So when a ship would be out at sea longer than expected (thus they actually needed more food for the longer than expected voyage), yet the bad bananas were killing off much of their existing produce, many times the crew ran out of food.

And if they were out at sea long enough, it could mean death.

But even at best case, it meant a smelly, stressful, and a very malnourished trip.

Not to mention, the stories the sailors came back with to their families and friends involved the mention of the “bad luck bananas”, furthering the “No Bananas on Board” superstition.

#4 Reason To Have No Bananas On Board Your Boat While Fishing

Wood eating, banana loving, termites.

bad luck fishing bananas

Back in the 1700s, all boats were made of wood.

And it was also said that some banana rich areas of Africa and the Caribbean had some of the most destructive wood-eating termites in the world.

So you can imagine that sometimes these termites would cling to the banana trees as they were dragged across the land to the docks where they were loaded on the ship.

And when the termites realized that they were now in an all wooden cargo hold, it was like a kid getting left in a candy store…aka Wood Heaven for a termite.

Needless to say, the termites went to town on the wooden ship, causing tons of damage, and in some cases eating holes in the hull that were not repairable (as the sailors found out about the leaks way too late).

Because many of the sailors wanted to blame the bad luck on something, the obvious patsy was the bananas, as they were the reason the termites had made it on board.

#5 Reason To Have No Bananas On Board Your Boat While Fishing

Fast “Banana Boats”

bad luck bananas on board

Sorry, I couldn’t resist putting this picture in…it has nothing to do with the blog

As I mentioned earlier, speed was of the essence when moving bananas across the ocean.

Another fact is that sailors on cargo ships loved to fish while at sea.

And because most cargo ships took their time and went at normal speeds, the crew would take breaks to catch fish, and usually did quite well.

But on the “Banana Boats”, they didn’t take breaks, and in most cases went full speed ahead to their destination.

In most cases, way too fast to be trolling to catch fish.

So what happened?

Crew members talk with other crew members from other boats, they realize that the banana boats seem to be the only ones that don’t catch fish, and thus a rumor is born.

One sailor tells another that they never catch a single fish when a banana is on board, and before you know it, everyone believes the myth.

 Conclusion

no bananas on board

Whether you believe in superstitions or not, it has hard to ignore the wild amount of fishing nightmares and instances of bad luck where bananas were on board the boat.

However, it is also easy to see how easy these rumors of bananas being bad luck on board fishing boats can spread out of control.

Fishermen and fisherwomen hate not catching fish, and blaming their bad fishing luck (or even boat problems or malfunctions) is something that has gone on for many generations of anglers.

And as long as people keep bringing bananas on board boats, expect to keep hearing stories of how the banana ruined their fishing trip.

Because when all else fails, it is easier to blame a banana than admit you just couldn’t catch any fish (or to explain why your bilge pump is acting up…)

What’s your craziest bad luck bananas on board story?

Let us know in the comments.

Related Post: “Are Bananas Really Bad Luck On Boats? [PICS & TRUE STORIES] (click here to see it now)

P.S. – Do you have a wild banana story on your boat? If so, please share it with us in the comment section. We would love to hear it.

P.P.S. – If you think your friends or fishing networks would like this article, please Tag them or Share it with them. It would mean a lot to me. You Rock!

 

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Andra
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Andra

The first time I ever heard of the “No bananas on board” rule was on a guided fishing trip my husband treated me to on my birthday. We were miles out, on our guide’s less than one-year-old Lake and Bay boat (which was exquisite I might add) and ready to move to another spot when he turned the ignition and… click. Nothing. Click again, nothing again. He called a friend who had a boat who managed to reach us 2 hours later (it was middle of the afternoon in mid-July) and who proceeded to tow us in. As we were slowly making it back to the harbor we broke out our packed lunches. My husband dug into his and pulled out, what else? A banana! Our guide saw it, grabbed it and chunked it overboard. That’s when we learned of the banana rule. Turns out the reason why his boat wouldn’t start was a cut wire. Something to do with the jackplate or tilt, and possibly, a banana.

keith dubose
Guest
keith dubose

Thw late Mr Jim Rizzuto .. Sport fishing author who lived and wrote many books about fishing in Hawaii… researched Bananas are bad luck superstition. There is no mention of it prior to the early 50’s when it was noted in a book of stories of the pioneers of Hawaii fishing.

He believed it grew out of this one tall tail .. starting in Hawaii and spreading from the the Hawaiian Captains, mates, and charter customers.

If anyone has a reference prior to 1952 please let us know

Andy
Guest
Andy

To me it’s just a myth, that some people take too far. People should have fun with it. I catch just as many fish and have just the same amount of bad luck with or with out Bananas.

Joy
Guest
Joy

I didn’t want to believe it was true and I understand the real science behind the superstition but the science doesn’t even begin to explain the experiences I’ve had with bananas onboard boats. I always say better safe than sorry so I leave my bananas onshore however as a new general rule i will always make sure everyone else knows this too. It’s not just fishing boats either- as a sailor I assure you it’s true- whatever you do- leave the bananas onshore. OR make sure you have full coverage insurance.

Roy Noblin
Member

years ago i always filled a half gallon jar with ice, 1/4 whiskey and filled with unsweetened lemon aid. about half way through i’d get to giggling and the fish would jump into my boat to see why. well my liver went out and i had to stop drinking so i started taking a banana. now the fish won’t leave me alone long enough to eat it without laying it down on the seat. i think they hear me when i peal it. 🙂

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Seriously? Myths are for children

Craig Kroll
Guest
Craig Kroll

Went to the blackfish banks to load up a cooler full. Through the day, marked fish, got ONE BITE,and caught a lizardfish ! Good God. Then the truth came out of this guys wife’s food bag. One big yelloe banana. If we weren’t 20 miles offshore of Charleston, SC, we would have made her swim home. Never a banana again !!

Luke Simonds
Admin

Sorry to hear about your bad luck banana fishing trip. At least you all got back safely.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I learned about the banana myth in islamorada. True story I can’t even eat a banana before I get on a ship. It was the worse day of fishing I ever had. I ever got into an argument. Never ever I swear or I will go bananas

newly educated fisherman
Guest
newly educated fisherman

I was unaware of the bad luck banana until 12-29-2016; the day I will not soon forget. Please keep in mind, I have been fishing in boats since I was just a little kid with my dad and had never heard of this. My wife had secretly booked a deep sea fishing trip for me prior to us leaving for our vacation to South Carolina. It all began with me arriving to the charter boat a few minutes late as they were going over the rules of the boat. I jumped aboard and quickly stowed my bag away under the seat and out of sight. As we headed out to sea, all was calm until the waves began to get rough. Before we knew it, the weather turned from a cloudy day to an all out storm on the waters and were treading through six to eight foot swells. Once we reached our destination and found the fish, all of us cast our lines, but with not a bite at all. If you are trying to bottom fish, idling in rough waters will keep your bait moving up and down off of the bottom, hence the no bites. After a few hours of the bobbing up and down and no fish biting, the crew began to chum the water with our breakfast. This would include the experienced fisherman along with the captain and myself. Now since this was a five hour tour, rather than a three hour tour, the time had come to head back to shore. After emptying our stomachs and being frustrated with no bites, we sat down on the way back and broke open the snacks and lunches. Since I was not feeling the best, I sat alone to recoup some energy and enjoy a snack. After completing the banana my wife had packed, the banana peel was noticed from the starboard side of the boat. There is a saying that goes like this “cussing like a sailor”. I finally understand what that means now. For the entire trip back, I learned many new, colorful phrases and words I had never heard before in addition to being highly educated on the curse of the bad luck banana. I have since educated others on the subject. I only wish I had known of the bad luck banana before I had wrongfully brought the banana aboard. To those who were aboard the unnamed boat with me, forgiveness is requested of my since reversed ignorance.

Luke Simonds
Admin

Thanks for sharing your story. Sorry to see that you learned the hard way about the “bad luck banana” superstition.

I’m not a superstitious person, but I’m always mindful to never take a banana on a boat given the many stories that I’ve heard about them along with a couple instances I’ve witnessed firsthand. Tight Lines!

CG Tim
Guest
CG Tim

I’ll take a quote from one of my favorite movies (Blazing Saddles): “You’ve got to remember that these are just simple farmers (in this case, fishermen). These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know… morons. “

Brian Smith
Guest
Brian Smith

Me (to my anti-banana friend Scott): “What if you went out one day and caught fish like crazy, all big, all the target species… and then learned someone had brought bananas and they’d been in the cooler all day – then what would you say?”

Scott: “Imagine how good the day COULD have been!”

Liz
Guest
Liz

Many years ago I was invited to go deep sea fishing with some friends on a 39′ Contender. I made breakfast sandwiches, packed snaks and my lunch. We had planned on a long day, we were going to be catching bait fish before dawn. After we caught enough of those shiny little beauties, we headed out to the Gulfstream. Watching the sun rise out of the ocean was almost spiritual.
Then the activity ramped up. We had kites in the air, lines in the water, all with the dream of a sailfish on the deck. After a couple of hours of changing things up, live bait, lures etc. slowing the boat, changing position, discussing going after grouper, trying to help alleviate the boredom and empty hooks, I get my lunchbag and offer my friends some snacks, apples, cheese crackers, chilled grapes, oranges, and (cue Jaws theme) bananas.
They almost tossed my bikini clad ass overboard. No one had ever told me about the banana thing. After refusing to walk the plank, opting for the flogging instead, I peeled them and tossed them over board.
And believe this or not, almolst instantly one of the reels sang that song we all hear in our sleep.

Rich Russell
Guest
Rich Russell

Bananas are bad juju I use to work for an on the water tower for several years and have seen it first hand. We had a sail boat with the keel ripped off and half sunk and yup bananas in the boat. Next we had a guy lost couldn’t find his chart and Chart plotter didn’t work I opened his cooler and bananas in it they went right over. Was towing a boat and my rudder mysteriously just broke off the boat upon getting the boat I was towing to the marina I saw a banana in the window in it and told them that’s why we all broke down. The next thing I saw was the banana flying through the air and the owner said never again.
Then yesterday my wife’s friend in our own boat decided to bring 2 bananas well soon as she saw them because she knows me. She grabbed them from her and fired them right over board and told her friend noooo don’t bring them ever again. Well we ended up in a sh$t house of a storm on the way home and my wife’s phone was in the cabin and we hit a wave and the phone bounced and is now in a crevice that can not be reached unless half the cabin is taken apart to get to it.
Moral of the story bananas are the worst juju and luck ever in a boat.

This also includes banana boat products some one left a bottle of sun tan oil by them one day and low and behold right after I found it I blew a hose clamp, you can not make this shi@ up.

Leslie
Guest
Leslie

I love bananas. I can’t even eat no more. But it’s OK. I still love them no mater what. That picture of the boat was sad. The story was interesting. No more bananas on boats. watching a show that shows a person put a banana on there friends boat and his water pipe broke . Now no ice in the fish chest because the banana was in there. Sorry talking to much bored right now.

Leslie
Guest
Leslie

Now I’m scared to eat bananas. I better tell my family to stop bring bananas on our boat.

Tom
Guest
Tom

Our rule goes as far as you don’t even eat a banana for breakfast before you go out. The best example I have is a few years ago we’re heading 30 miles out of John’s Pass to a spot that we had fished and dove many times, it always had quality grouper, snapper, hogfish, etc… We get out there and anchor up over some prime bottom, drop down some bottom rigs and throw a couple free lines out the back. We fished all day and all we pulled up were porgys, lizard fish, and one bonita on the free line. We finally had enough of it and started jetting in. We get about 10 miles from the pass and I start getting shocked by the steering wheel, turns out a wire had come loose some where in the boat and was sending live electricity to every piece of metal in the center console. That problem has never occurred again and needless to say I’ve not had a banana for breakfast since.

DJ Conlon
Guest
DJ Conlon

So the reason I looked this up today is I wentered fishing today and I brought two bananas for my fiance and I to eat on the 1 hr. Long ride to the landing (special spot) . I ate mine, my fiance at half of hers and brought the other half on the boat. We had already left the dock by the time I found out, so I let it slide. I maintain my 18′ Bay boat meticulously. I juse greased the steering the night before. So we get to our farthest point in the backwaters of georgetown, SC and my steering Cable just snaps as I am idling through the creek. Instead of fishing I spent the rest of the day wrestling my motor and rigging up a tiller handle made of my Landing net handle and a bunch of zip ties to get 15 miles back to the landing. First time a banana has ever been on my boat. I need some t-shirts!

X-treme Fishing
Guest
X-treme Fishing

I will bring 13 Whistling Monkeys eating BANANAS on board and still catch fish all day long. If I’am the Captain no problem. Because I have that munch faith in my abilities. There is no excuse for not catching fish. You must learn the way’s of the Fishing JEDI. Let the force be with you. Capt, Tommy Butler..

Cade Langston
Member

I have an uncle that fishes the PTTS out of Boca Grande every year (Captain TJ Stewart) and won two years ago. He purposely bring bananas on his boat every day lol. Still catches plenty of MASSIVE tarpon and freaks out the other captains. Fun stuff! I’m not bringing any on my boat after hearing your story, though. Sounds about right.

Shawn M
Guest
Shawn M

First time I ever fished with a banana on board we caught 2 permit on fly on the flats of Key West. I didn’t think of the banana until days later, but I guess we were lucky! Nonetheless, a great read and good perspective!

Barry
Guest
Barry

While ur going, don’t drive down that road after a black cat has crossed it and if you break a mirror…. Ur done.

Lou
Guest
Lou

My buddy does quite a bit of fishing in lake erie. Never heard of the banana myth and took one. After a long night of slow fishing 10 miles off shore. He started running full speed and about 2 miles into the trip he heard and god awful sound and boat comes the a complete stop. He tore of the lower unit on a rock shoal. He he was 50 yards either way he would have missed it.

I’ve always been taught about the myth and have never had them.on my boat, my great uncle did bring a banana on striper charter we were on and we had average fishing and no boat issues. I stay on the safe side and keep bananas off of my boat

Paul
Guest
Paul

yeah, I never heard this until I started watching “Wicked Tuna”.

jason
Guest
jason

Superstitions are dumb. Luck doesn’t exist.

Anthont
Guest
Anthont

Why would you go 21mi out in a flats boat?

Peter Jackson
Member

what a load of crapola ….what a croc ,,,,,every time we go fishing we always take a bunch of LUCKY BANANAS with us with out fail 🙂 and we ALWAYS return with a BOAT LOAD of fish YEEEEHAAAA ……BANANAS RULE OK

Paul
Guest
Paul

Had my best day fishing ever with a whole bunch of bananas on board! Yellowtail couldn’t get in the boat fast enough.

Dillon
Guest
Dillon

I’m a believer all the way today we went fishing off the coast of Atlantic city Nj and caught nothing, I mean not one bite no junk fish nothing. Then the clouds and winds came and the seas become a quick 7-10 ft swells, when we came into the inlet it become apparent we had a banana on board. We threw it overboard and immediately saw results then to end us a bad not we discovered another banana immidtly my line got caught in the mayor and we ran aground the end

Sue Holzschuher
Guest
Sue Holzschuher

Interesting article. I have been a fisherman all my life and never heard this till now. I blame bad luck on dill pickles. We leave those at home. Lol

Amanda
Guest
Amanda

I do believe this is true. Every year when the Cod fishery is open my family and I go out and we always do really well, and one particular day we went out and I had a lunched packed that included a banana. We hardly caught any fish, and we ended up catching a shark that scared the crap out of us hahaha It was definitely a day to remember but never again will I bring a banana on board again

Adam Croslin
Member

My brother and I went on a guided red fish trip in Galveston about three years ago. We got the spot and started straight hammering big twenty thirty pound bulk reds. And I look to left and see a bright yellow f-n banana peel float by in the water. I look to my bro like WTF is that and he points down to the CAPTAIN who is finishing up his god forsaken banana. I was blown away. However we continued to hammer those reds got some black drum too a few sharks some catfish. Prob boated over 40 fish. Over all one of the top fishing trips I’ve ever had. I still firmly believe in no bananas but that day it didn’t slow the fish.

Ben
Guest
Ben

I was fishing in the Bahamas in 2011 and we had a banana on board. The fishing was awful for us, we only caught one baby barracuda. The other boats did great catching wahoo and jacks. We through the banana overboard but it was too late, the damage was already done.

Peter Jackson
Member

we cant believe all you woozies actually believe that bull about nana,s ,,,thats only a stupid bloody old wives tale which was told by a stupid old wife ,,hee hee hahahahaheheheehhahahehehhaahheh god give me A BANANA ANY DAY ,,,

James Whitaker
Member

I can’t count how many times I’ve thrown clients bananas overboard as we are heading out of the channel. No bananas means no bananas.

Melita
Member

Funny we bring bananas when we go out fushing they are good when you are hot. We bring thdm when we go sailing. We did not have anything bad happen funny story.

capt Bill
Guest
capt Bill

True story. We had a banner day with our crew of four on striped bass, except for one guy. We all caught our limit but one crew member got skunked! As we were unloading the boat, we noticed he had a banana in his duffel bag. We never really talked about it much after that until 2 years later. Prior to a striper trip on the same boat, I ate a banana on the car trip to the boat…it’s all I had to eat and I violated my own rule that I adhered to for 50 or more years.
We didn’t catch a single striper that day which was highly unusual….we alway caught at least a couple. To try to save the day we took the boat to the inlet Jetty and stemmed the tide while casting near the rocks. As we were fishing a rouge wave hit the boat and pushed us into the jetty and up on the rocks. The hull hit and the props both bent but on the next wave we hit the throttles and went over the jetty to the other side. It was very rough but we were able to limp back to the marina and get the boat hauled. No more Bananas…

Andy
Guest
Andy

My first tarpon trip off Sanibel in the early 1990s, Ate a lot of bananas because I was told that they help the body recover more quickly after exercise. While we were loading our food onto the skiff, the captain saw the bananas and told me to put them back in the car, not to get close to his boat with the bananas. I was incensed and as I carried them back to my car, I started to eat every single one of the bananas, as I didn’t want them to go to waste … I was muttering to myself about the nonsense and gobbling the bananas down. I threw the peels in the trash can and came back to the boat. The fishing was slow, the wind was up, fish did show in the afternoon, but not many and we only got one hook up. On the way in, the captain asked me if I ate the bananas and told me to make sure they were out of my system the next morning. I followed his orders and the next several days, the fishing was on fire … the fish were plentiful, boat numbers were low and the fish were eating everything we threw at them.

Capt Steve
Guest
Capt Steve

I owned a small 6 pack fishing charter business for several years and NO bananas is the rule . One story in particular was very interesting . We had five guys fishing in the Atlantic , 4 of the guys were tearing it up . The 5th guy , not even a bite . The 5th guy pulls out a banana and I tell him the perils of having a banana on board , he says hogwash . I told him to eat the banana and throw the peel overboard asap . He did , and at exactly the time the peel hit the water a 60lb Kingfish hit his line . This has happened more than once , not the Kingfish , but the banana part . I had a crew member that didn’t even allow banana bread or banana oil sun lotion or any other item that may contain banana in it on board .

T
Guest
T

I just learned of the no bananas on a boat last week while on a whale shark swim tour in Mexico. The captain made a strong point NOT to bring bananas on his boat, no one did, all was fine, saw whale sharks, mantas, dolphin and caught some Tuna. We went on that same tour 3 days later with a different group of guests, but didn’t notice the captain never mentioned the no bananas on board.
As we sailed about an hour into the trip one of the guests was eating a banana, the whole boat gently teased how dare they, now what will become of our trip. In summary, we had a fantastic tour with whale sharks, dolphin, mantas and caught a tuna and mahi mahi on the way back, BUT… When after the boat stopped to offer some snorkeling for their guests, the motor wouldn’t start. We were stranded at sea for 2 1/2 hours and had to have a second boat come out to rescue us. So I understand the whole banana theory now.

Ruben
Guest
Ruben

We go fishing with a guide in Baffin Bay, Corpus Christi, Tx, that does not like bananas on his boat!!!

Pete Hilton
Member

My best friend and I took a couple of days off and made a trip to PCB for a Kayak Gulf fishing trip with Pony Donald! My morning started with putting 5 bananas on my Hobie PA 12. I had sealed my Samsung Tab4 phone into its waterproof case along with my fishing license. Pony needed to take a photo of our licenses for his records, so I took it out of the sealed case. When I put it back, I thought that I had resealed the case hanging around my neck. Upon launching in the surf, I went to snap a couple of photo of my buddy launching. There was about a half inch of water inside the case.
I immediately took the phone apart and removed the battery. I placed all the parts inside a ziplock bag with some small items under my seat. As the day went by, 2 miles offshore, the fishing was good. My buddy did manage to fall out of his yak but didn’t loose anything. I put a couple of 6 oz lead sinkers in the bag to keep them from rolling around the kayak floor.
I did eat one of the bananas during the trip. Once we made it back to the breakers, Pony told me not to try and ride them in. I didn’t listen and the boat rolled. Of course the ziplock bag had been long forgotten and it wasn’t sealed. There went the phone and everything else in the bag. Long story short, NO BANANAS will make it on my next trip!

Dawn
Guest
Dawn

2 wkends ago we had 3 strange happenings and it was the first time a banana had ever been onboard!

Johnny Dugan
Guest
Johnny Dugan

On a fishing trip last week fishing the Salmon River out of Riggins Idaho I noticed when we boarded the boat the Captain was eating a banana….I thought “Oh $%

Margaret Skorupski
Guest
Margaret Skorupski

I read that an executive from the Fruit of the loom company charted a boat out of Miami,and they had terrible luck.the captain asked “Who brought a banana on board?” The executive pointed to the banana on the logo of his underwear.The captain demanded that he remove them.He did-and the fish started biting! There is no longer a banana in the logo…..

Luke Simonds
Admin

Haha… thanks for sharing the great story!

Andy
Guest
Andy

Yes that was the Great Capt. Bouncer Smith … he is a nut about bananas … but the funny thing is, a leading executive has a house up in Maine that I sometimes fish out front of on the rocks … when I learned who lived there, I slipped off the rocks, fortunately not too much water got into my waders and it was a shallow pool that I slipped into … so who knows, i never put it together until now …

John
Guest
John

One day a buddy of mine invites me along to troll for salmon. I bring my normal lunch when I’m on my kayak of crackers, smoked salmon and a banana.We set out at first light and proceed to limit out by 10 with many more hooked. As we are heading in I open my lunch box and my buddy sees the banana, grabs it and chucks it overboard.wtf I say. He says it’s bad luck, even though we had an epic morning. So I ask my dad who grew up as a deck hand on his uncles fishing boat in South Carolina and was in the navy, he’d never heard this. Win I was in a remote fishing village on the Pac coast of Panama, where they use boats to travel along the coast to get bananas, no one had heard of it either. I caught loads of rockfish, halibut and salmon this year always with a banana for lunch, so obviously I think it’s complete hogwash. 

Luke Simonds
Member

I was invited to go offshore with some guys I didn’t know. Its was a slow trolling day and the captain was getting frustrated. After hours of nothing, I go to get my lunch out of my bag and as I opened it I realized my wife packed me a banana (she was unaware of the superstition). All I could think was “how am I going to get this thing off the boat with no one seeing”? Eventually I smuggled it to the back of the boat and when everyone was turned I chucked it. Within 10 minutes we had our first Mahi on. I was thinking “no way”! Five minutes later double header. I laughed to myself and we caught fish after fish. I think we ended up catching 12 studs and a bunch of peanuts. I never told those guys, but I definitely check my lunch before fishing.

Luke Simonds
Admin

Here’s another one… a friend and I had a free weekend so we decided to go down to Boca Grande to hit up some spots where I found some good fish the week before. On the way home after fishing hard all day without catching a single fish (not even a trash fish), his dad takes out a banana from the boat cooler for a snack… So we decided to try Tampa the next day (without a banana this time), and left trailer tire went flat on the way there (while in the speed lane on I4), and then the right one blew on the way home so I had to sit on a boat on the side of a road on a detached trailer for an hour while he had to go find car place open on a Sunday evening. Was the slow fishing and multiple flats due to that banana? Probably not, but I’m certainly not going to test it out again.