How To Spool A Spinning Reel With Braid While Saving Money And Time [VIDEO]

By: Luke Simonds on August 15, 2017
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how to spool braided fishing line

You are going to like this fishing tip…

Why?

Because I am going to reveal a really cool tip on spooling your spinning reel that will save you a bunch of money going forward.

Let me explain.

Once I finally opened up to the idea of upgrading to braid (from mono) on my spinning reels, my results skyrocketed.

Not only did it allow me to cast significantly further than what I was able to do with mono, but I also was shocked at how much more feel it allowed me to have when working my lures because of its zero stretch nature.

Those two benefits combined are the primary factors why I will be sticking with braid going forward.

The only downside in my opinion to braid is that it costs more than mono.

But spooling a spinning reel with braid doesn’t have to break the bank…

In fact, there are some tricks to spooling with braid that can actually make it more cost effective than mono.

Note: Make sure to watch the full video on how to spool your spinning reel with braid at the bottom of this post.

How To Save Money And Time Spooling Braid

how to spool a spinning reel

Since the most common negative attribute associated with braided line in most fishing circles is about its cost, I thought I’d share some tips on how to use braid without breaking the bank.

Savings Tip #1

First, I highly recommend matching your reel size to the type of fish that you’re planning to target…

But be sure to keep in mind that the braid is much thinner than mono, so the reels you used to use for mono will hold much more braid…

So savings tip #1 is the ability to downsize your spinning reel without losing line capacity.

For example, I used to always use 4000 series reels when inshore fishing for snook, redfish, and trout while using 10 lb mono… but I now use 2500 series reels (which are less expensive) for those same species and I’ve never had any issues with line capacity when using 10 lb braid.

And in case you’re worried that 10 lb test and a 2500 reel will fail you if a surprise tarpon strikes, then check out this video:

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Savings Tip #2

Another benefit of braid vs. mono is that braid doesn’t lose it’s strength as quickly as mono does due to wear and tear from usage and/or exposure from the elements.

When using mono, I found myself having to spool much more frequently than I now do with braid.

In fact, the reel that I used in the detailed “how to spool” video below is the same one that I caught the tarpon with in the video shown above over 6 months ago, and I had spooled that line on 6 months before that…

So that braid lasted me a full year, and it was still in pretty darn good shape when I took it out to make the new spooling video.

Savings #2… braid will last longer than mono.

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Savings Tip #3

Another benefit of braid is that it’s true breaking strength typically is higher than that of mono. Knowing this along with the fact that braided line doesn’t weaken much due to exposure to the elements opens the door for some more savings for anglers like you and me who don’t like to waste money…

So savings tip #3 involves splicing the braid at a measured yardage mark in order to allow the base line to stay on the spool for a very long time while only replacing the top section at a pre-determined yardage whenever duty calls.

Since I spend most of my time stalking redfish, snook, and trout in the shallows, it is very rare that I have more than 75 yards of line out…

Knowing this, I purposefully walk out 75 yards of line after the very first time I load my reel with braid, and cut the line at that 75-yard mark…

Then, I’ll tie a Modified Double Uni Knot (for braid to braid) to connect the line back together and that will be the point at which I go back to for all future re-spooling needs.

Note: Here’s a video showing the strongest braid to braid knot that I’ve found so far:

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By splicing the braid at this measured point, I know that I’ll get exactly 4 re-spools out of the 300-yard braid spools that I most often buy (or get two re-spools from a 150-yard spool that are commonly sold).

Before doing this 75-yard splice, I would often only get one re-spool from a 150 yarder and roughly 2 from a 300 yarder…

This simple tip helped me cut the cost of fishing with braid in half.

How To Spool A Spinning Reel With Braid

Most fishing shops offer line spooling services, but the most affordable way is, of course, to buy your own braid and spool it yourself.

And an added bonus to this is that you won’t be at the store’s time schedule whenever you need to re-spool… just get your line and load it onto your reel.

But before spooling braid on a spinning reel just like you’ve always done with mono, there are a couple very important things to keep in mind…

1. Braid Has Less Friction Than Mono

Braid has less friction than mono, so you can’t just tie it around a bare spool like you do with mono and load the line because that will put you at risk of the entire load of braid spinning uncontrollably around the bare spool leaving you unable to reel in a big fish..

But the good news is that this setback is easy to overcome… here are two options:

  1. Start with monofilament line – Start with mono, and then tie a mono to braid knot after filling at least a layer of mono around the entire base of the spool.
    mono backing on spool
  2. Apply tape on the spool – Applying a layer or two of electrical or masking tape around the bare spool of the reel is a common practice since it’ll help the braid generate friction on the spool.

Note: My personal preference has always been to start loading with mono because it holds great, and takes up some extra space with less expensive line… even the 2500 reels can hold more than enough 10 lb braid to handle most inshore fish.

2. Pack It Tight

Braid is much thinning than mono, so it is more prone to dig into itself if it isn’t packed tightly onto the spool.

Once it digs into lower layers, the casting performance will decline and the risk of generating pesky wind knots significantly increases…

So always make sure to keep firm tension on the braid when spooling it and keep it consistent throughout the loading of the line.

Now that the two most important considerations of spooling braid are addressed, here’s a video that shows the entire process including all knots needed for the various connections:

Spooling A Spinning Reel [MAIN VIDEO]

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Conclusion

Using braided line can be an absolute game changer for anglers who target saltwater species with artificial lures because of the increased casting performance and feel that it provides in comparison to monofilament line.

And the good news is that using this “more expensive line” doesn’t have to break the bank…

In fact, there are multiple cost cutting tips that can end up making the switch to braided line pay for itself.

Best of all, it can all be done without having to rely on a tackle store to spool the braid onto the reel… just takes a few items and less time than it would take to drive to the tackle shop.

Related Post: How To Eliminate Line Twists In A Spool

Want to catch more inshore fish?

Want to belong to a fishing club that “gets you?”

Then join the only fishing club with a 365-day guarantee that you’ll catch more fish and have more fun out on the water.

Click here now for more info.

P.S. – If you think your angler friends or fishing networks would like to see this, please Tag them or Share this with them so that they can enjoy some savings on braided line too.

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Bill Woodhouse
Member

Luke. Pls comment on Piscifun device as reviewed on the Marx Fishind YouTube channel. Thanx!

Sean Paschal
Member

on one of my 2500’s I have 200 yards of braid on the spool, so I’m curious as to what you recommend doing with that base? Do you just keep it on there and never use it other than a base?

Carlos
Guest
Carlos

Just wanted to point out that there is an app and a couple of sites that I found that help you calculate the amount of backing based on the reel’s capacity info and the mono backing line specs you want to use and how much main braid line you want. I use both spinning and casting reels and as I understand it these reels perform better with a full spool and reels can hold hundreds of yard of braid that you would never use specially if you use 10# braid as per your post, in my case I accomplish this and save money by using a lot of mono as backing and the rest is the amount of braid I want/expect to use for the target application of the reel (bass is less than inshore). The app along with a line counter helps me figure it all out and It’s not that much more work and if I want to go even further with extending the life of the braid I flip the braid starting at the mono backing joint if not I just reload with new braid from the mono joint forward. Hope this helps others that may want to do the same. Great site, great content. I think that you could add this type of calculator to your site. The android app I use is called CalcLine.

Rich
Guest
Rich

Stupid question. Why not just walk out 75 yards when your ready to respool instead of walking before and cut /splice?

Richard Fiorentino
Member

Curious – how did you know it was 75 yards?

Mike Shannon
Member

Very helpful Luke – Thanks for the post!

I’ve been switching all of my reels to braid from mono and need some help. Most of my reels do not show a spool capacity for braid. So, how can I calculate the amount of braid I need to have on hand when I start the spool load?. E.G.: Spool capacity 250 yards of 25# mono = XX yards of 0.095 dia braid. I can see a couple of ways to present this , but the best might be a “calculator”. That is the user inputs the known mono spool capacity (25#, 250 yards) and the diameter of the braid the user intends to load, the the “calculator” outputs the number of yards of the specified diameter tail needed to fill the spool.

Have you seen such A tool? Can you add this tool to the Salt Strong site?
Thanks for the continuous flow of relevant information and community connectivity!!

Michael McDowell
Member

Thanks again. It is so nice to be able to keep coming back and reviewing these videos every couple of months for consistency and error reduction. would hate to have a mistake cost me a big fish.

Jim Saylor
Guest
Jim Saylor

Wish I’d of known this trick years ago would of save money on new spools big time,Thx

Buck
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Buck

Luke, I just picked up an automatic line spooler. Seems to put the line on really tight for my baitcaster. What are your thoughts on those? Have you ever used one – https://shop.tackle.org/collections/fishing/products/fishing-line-spooler-for-mono-and-braided-line

dlatchum@gmail.com
Member

Why not use a double double uniknot at the splice?

Steve Klott
Member

Hey Luke, nice job once again! What braid do you prefer and why?

Jhun
Guest
Jhun

Hello Sir, for some reasons you need to cut your braided line and it become shorter and shorter (specially for trolling use). Do you suggest to have a joint between braided lines to make it long again and save some money on the process. If so, what will be the recommended knot between braid to braid of the same size?

Roland Leveque
Member

Just wanted to let you all know how much I enjoy your articles and video’s. Thanks for a great job!

Peter Barber
Member

Unfortunately, I haven’t yet moved to SW Florida so I’m stuck up north fishing for muskies, bass and walleyes. For years I’ve used 50 & 80# braids. Unless you want to buy a lot of expensive line, using backer is essential. On big baitcasting reels for muskie, I allow for 50 yds. of braid and use what ever amount of backing is needed to fill the reel. Mono is great; but, I’ve found and now prefer 30# Green Spot dacron. A back-to-back uniknot to splice the 2 lines does not fail. Taking this experience to light weight spinning reels (1500 to 3000 series) for bass and walleye, I use 50 yds. of 6 to 20# braid and fill the spool with 20# Black Spot dacron. In any case, wind it on tight and it won’t backlash except when casting repeatedly into a strong wind. Watch for the braid fraying, especially in the 1st 6 – 10′. Cut it off and re-tie. Braid will last several years and won’t retain memory on the reel. After some long amount of time of continuous use, I’ll cut out the uniknot and reverse the braid. Test the backing before reversing the braid. Every so many years, I’ll replace the backing.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

When you show how to do or not, you should use a thick piece of twine or cord so the knot and is more easily visualize

Jim
Guest
Jim

Hi Luke, just wondering what braid brand are you using right now for fishing? Thx…

Dwain Holmes
Guest
Dwain Holmes

I fill My Arid 4000’s with either 20 or 30 # braid!I fish surf from a boat anchored off the breakers and 75 yards does not cut it!Also I take several wraps of braid around the spool and then tie a Uni type knot but make 12 wraps and pull down as tight as possible and never have a problem with slippage and like a full spool of braid because I catch both rooster fish and jacks in the surf!The current is very heavy because I am fishing the falling tide at the mouth of the largest estuary in Central America!The current is running 4 to 6 miles per hour and even a 25 inch jack will take 100+ yards aof line when it gets the current to it’s advantage!Also catch Cubera snapper,mackerel,and snook!I have straightened many hooks on red fish lures,used to fish them in S.TX before retiring,and believe Me the strongest red does not even come close to most of these fish in a fight!

Nicholas George
Member

What size mono do you use for what size braid? does it matter?

Shea Frazier
Member

One of the reasons I love the Battle 2s that I use – the “braid ready” spool. No need for a backing.

Dwain Holmes
Guest
Dwain Holmes

Tied right You do not need backing on any reel with braid unless it is a very small reel!Just take about 8 or 10 wraps around the spool tie a uni knot but wrap 12 times and pull as tight as You can and I have never had a slippage problem or knot failure!Had a store fill 2 large spinners with 50 pound braid and knot came loose!

Jeff Quinn
Member

What if the first time you marked 75 yards with a sharpie marker instead of cutting the line? With the yellow Power Pro it should show up well.

Carmelo Midolo
Guest
Carmelo Midolo

Thanks Luke. That was cool the 75 yd move I guess I good do that every 100yds. For surf fishing. Like the fg knot braid to mono. Better than Alberto knot l think