How To Catch Speckled Trout In The Summer (Best Spots, Lures, & More)

http://how%20to%20catch%20trout%20in%20summer

Want to catch more speckled trout this summer?

Trout are aggressive ambush predators and they’re fun to catch because there’s so many different ways to target them.

They’ll blow up topwater lures or slurp up a soft plastic off the bottom, but if you want to maximize your chances of catching them you need to have a clear gameplan.

To help you with that, we’ve got Capt. Jud Brock of EasternAngling.com breaking down everything you need to know about catching summertime trout in this video.

You’ll learn:

  • The best spots to find trout (no matter where you live)
  • The three best lures to catch trout
  • What their favorite summertime meal is
  • And much more

Check out the video below!

How To Catch Trout In The Summer [VIDEO]

Sign up for FREE to receive the latest saltwater fishing videos, tutorials, product reviews, and fishing product discounts!

➡ Click here to join the Insider Club

This is part three of Capt. Brock’s summertime inshore slam series.

You can watch the first two videos below:

Alright, now let’s get into how to catch summertime trout!

Where To Catch Trout In The Summer

Since trout are ambush predators, they like to hunt where there is a disturbance in the water, such as two different currents colliding, or physical structure.

Here are some of the best places to catch trout this time of year:

Current Seams & Breaks

Wherever there are two different speeds of water, you’re likely to find trout patrolling the area, looking for an easy meal to get swept by.

Areas where two creeks converge, or a marsh edge that has a creek flowing out of it are good examples of places where there are current seams.

This is your best place to start looking for summertime trout.

Big Heavy Structure

If you’re looking for big trout, big structure is a good option.

This includes:

  • Industrial docks
  • Jetties
  • Rock piles

Oyster bars are also great, especially in the early morning or evening when water is flowing over or around them.

Wherever You See Croaker Or Mullet

Croaker are probably trouts’ favorite summertime meal, so if you’re catching them on a sabiki or a really light setup, there are probably trout around.

Also, if you see a school of mullet cruising down a grass line and then see them scattering along the surface, there’s likely trout nearby feeding on them.

Best Lures For Catching Trout In The Summer

Although trout will hit a variety of lures, here are three of Capt. Brock’s favorites:

Topwater lures

Smaller topwaters, like the Skitterwalk or Super Spook Jr., are great for catching trout of all sizes, but if you really want to target the bigger trout, you might want to go with a bigger topwater, like the full-size Super Spook or a One Knocker.

Whatever size topwater you choose, you’ve got a good chance of catching quality trout, as Capt. Brock’s biggest summertime trout are usually caught on topwaters.

As far as color goes, it doesn’t matter too much.

What really matters is the noise and action, so if you’re doing a good walk-the-dog retrieve over structure or current seams, then you’ve got a good chance of getting blown up by a trout.

Paddletails

Capt. Brock’s second option for summer trout is a paddletail rigged on a jig head.

Specifically, he likes the Z-Man MinnowZ rigged on a Texas Eye jig head or a Redfish Eye jig head.

Capt. Brock catches large numbers of smaller trout with paddletails in the summer.

Suspending Twitchbait

If the current is calmer, a suspending twitchbait like the Mirrolure 17MR is a good choice.

It has good flash and vibration in the water, and works best with a twitch-twitch-pause retrieve.

Conclusion

how to catch trout in summer in north carolina

If you want to catch lots of summertime trout, first find some structure and current breaks, like oysters bars, docks, or where a creek mouth empties into a bigger body of water.

Then throw a topwater, paddletail, or twitchbait and hang on.

If you want to catch bigger trout, find some big structure, like jetties or industrial docks, and toss out a big topwater.

Have any questions about catching summertime trout?

Let us know in the comments below!

This is part three of Capt. Brock’s summertime inshore slam series.

You can watch the first two videos below:

If you’re in North Carolina and want to book a trip with Capt. Brock, you can reach him at EasternAngling.com, check him out on Instagram @judbrockfishing, or tune into his podcast, the Eastern Current Fishing Podcast.

And if you know someone who wants to catch more trout this summer, please TAG or SHARE this with them!

P.S. Want access to our best fishing spots and tips, plus discounts to our online tackle store? Click here to join us in the Insider Club!

Related articles:

Related categories:

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

STOP WASTING TIME ON THE WATER!

Do what the “SMART ANGLERS” are doing and join the Insider Club.

Here’s what you’ll receive today when you join:

Other Fishing Tips You May Like :

How To Retrieve Topwater Lures On A Kayak Like A Pro

Do you love to use topwater lures on your kayak? Sometimes it can be difficult due to limited space, but if you know the one thing that...
See Full post
8 comments

The One Fish That Changed Bill Dance’s Life Forever…

The legendary Bill Dance shares his story on the podcast! He talks about the fish that changed his life forever, making a career in fishing, and much more.
See Full post
10 comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x