Where & When To Catch Inshore Flounder (No Matter Where You Live)

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Have you heard of the 90-10 rule?

It states that 90% of the fish are going to be in 10% of the water.

It’s true for all fish, but especially flounder.

If you’re using an attractive search bait, like a paddletail or topwater lure, a redfish or trout might come chase it down when they hear or feel the commotion.

However, flounder plant themselves on the bottom waiting for an easy meal to swim by, so unless you put your lure right in front of their face, there’s essentially zero chance of you catching one.

To catch them, you need to be very intentional about where to find them.

So where do flounder like to hang out?

Check out the video below.

P.S. Using these tips, I was able to land my personal-best flounder, and then beat it the very next week!

The Best Place & Time To Catch Flounder [VIDEO]

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Since a flounder is a flounder, no matter if it’s from Texas or North Carolina, these tips will work wherever you live.

To know where to find them, you first need to understand what and how they eat.

What & How Flounder Eat

In the spring, flounder come from their offshore winter homes to their summer inshore homes.

This is because in the springtime there’s an influx of baitfish and shrimp that show up in the marshes, creeks, and bays and these flounder are looking for easy meals.

And although all of the inshore gamefish are ambush predators, flounder take it to the next level.

Trout or snook will hunt down their prey, redfish will forage for their prey in the mud, but flounder just sit and wait for their meals to float by.

They bury themselves in the mud or sand and, with their two eyes on top of their head, look for something to float by them.

Where & When To Catch Flounder

where to find flounder

Because flounder are looking for baitfish and shrimp, and because of their ambush-style feeding habits, they need to be in places where there is lots of bait and current.

The best places where you find lots of both of those are chokepoints near estuaries.

Chokepoints, or bottlenecks, include structures like creek mouths and passes or channels near flats.

Now, how do you find the best chokepoints?

Here are two factors to look for:

  1. How narrow is the area
  2. How much bait is around

A narrow creek mouth, like the one pictured above, will be much easier for flounder to catch baitfish because they’ll be more concentrated than in a wide-open pass.

And chokepoints near structure such as mangrove trees, oyster bars, grass, or docks will attract more bait.

As far as when to catch flounder, it’s all about current.

Incoming or outgoing tide doesn’t matter as much as the fact that it’s moving.

If you go at slack tide, or during a time where there is very little current, then you probably won’t catch as many flounder as if you go when the current is stronger.

Also, as mentioned earlier, flounder are mostly caught during spring, summer, and fall.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for flounder in the spring, summer, or fall, look for narrow chokepoints with structure nearby.

Bounce a jig on the bottom when the current is ripping through and wait for the strike.

Plus, don’t forget to bring your cooler (if they’re open for harvest in your area), because flounder are some of the most delicious fish in our inshore waters.

Have any questions about catching flounder?

Let us know in the comments below.

And if you know someone who would love to catch more flounder, please TAG or SHARE this with them!

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Daniel
16 days ago

How far up in the creeks and bayous do they go? I would be fishing in and around PCB on vacation. Don’t want to waste all my time by going too far up or not far enough up these creeks looking for them. When they come inshore do they gradually move deeper into the bayous and creeks or do they go to “their” spot and set up shop?

Anonymous
9 months ago

Get information to know on tactics and location

Francisco Medina
9 months ago

Wyatt, great video, great info, just 1 comment, perhaps when you’re describing the spots to where the footage is from you could also show the specific spot on google earth (Maps) to get a feel for it on the map as well as on the real life footage.
Thanks

lkylindy
9 months ago

Why not drift over the spots instead of casting from a fixed point

Kevin Stevens
9 months ago

How are you setting the hook . It doesn’t look like you’re jerking the rod super hard looks more like just a solid pull. Flounder sometimes dont bite real hard

Joe Anderson
9 months ago
Reply to  Kevin Stevens

I have noticed this too watching the videos over the last couple of months. Hopefully Wyatt will respond.

Mark McKinney
10 months ago

Very good, thank you…

Stuart Rhodes
10 months ago

I am from Eastern Long Island. These are called fluke up there. They have teeth and they are very aggressive. I have caught some 3 ft long. Doormats they’re called.Flounder up there have tiny little mouths and we used muscles for the main bait and worms. Yes

Terry Gillette
10 months ago

Great video and thanks for the tips. I fish in North Carolina at the South River, on the edge of the Neuse River across from Oriental NC. Being on the edge of the Pamlico Sound, we do not have tides per say, but wind tides. That being said, I assume I need to find the wind coming through choke points if possible and fish that area as if the breeze on the water was bringing in baitfish. Does that make sense and sound right? Your thoughts?

Anonymous
9 months ago
Reply to  Terry Gillette

I fish the same river and have the exact same question!

oswaldo
11 months ago

Great information on flounder, how often do you switch lures or would you use one that mimics a shrimp??

Tom Widman
11 months ago

Wyatt
Another really informative video. Great job!
I am looking forward to August 16 when we can start keeping flounder in NC. I’ll definitely start to look for chokepoints in the creeks in the upcoming weeks.
I think you are in NC as well. What area are you fishing in? I think the video you did on YoZuri topwaters was in that came creek. Thanks, Tom

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