Best Fishing Tips (Salt Strong Newsletter Feb 24, 2019)

By: Joseph Simonds on February 22, 2019
Found In:

four spot redfish

Happy Sunday!

It’s been an amazing week, from catching black drum to getting the perfect fish pic, and I want to make sure you don’t miss a beat.

Check out the best Insider reports, public tips, and podcast episodes from this week below:

Insider Reports [EXCLUSIVE]

Public Tips

Fish Strong Podcast

Do you have any specific tips you want us to film?

Let us know by leaving a comment down below!

P.S. have you heard about our Super Community? Check it out here.

Do You Want To Quickly Find New Fishing Spots In Your Area?

Then you’ve got to see this private fishing club!

Here’s what you’ll receive today:

  • Weekly fishing reports and TRENDS revealing where the inshore fish are feeding all year long
  • Weekly “spot dissection” videos that walk you through all the best spots in certain areas
  • Exclusive fishing tips from the PROS you can’t find anywhere else
  • Everything you need to start catching fish more consistently (regardless if you fish out of a boat, kayak, or land).

Click here to join today.

P.P.S. know any anglers who need to read some of these articles? TAG or SHARE this with them!

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Richard FiorentinoLuke SimondsCharles McNallyAnonymous Terry GreggStan Levanduski Recent comment authors
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Terry Gregg
Member

do you have a video for beginners on how to operate a fishfinder shch as a lowrance elite 5 or 7. beginning from scratch. plenty of videos out there for fishermam who already know how to use one. thanks, Terry Gregg

Luke Simonds
Admin

We do not have one yet, but we have that on our list of lessons to create.

Stan Levanduski
Member

I’ve been going through some of the lessons on identifying fishing location by using the satellite maps from Google, Bing, etc. Great information, but one concern. When I look at the images, some of them are seriously out of date. In some cases, there is a date stamp indicating when the area was imaged. In other cases, I know the land based building along the gulf coast or bay shorelines have had major changes, which do not show up on the overhead images.
The question is, with the images being sooooooo out of date, is the area dissection for fishing still valid. So, if we’re working with a satellite image that is several years old, will the sand bars and other structures shown still be relevant or is it more likely that they would have been significantly by mother nature?
Thanks in advance.

Luke Simonds
Admin

Hey Stan, the unfortunate fact is that we do not have any way to have real-time information. The satellite maps get updated on occasion, but there is not a set time so there will def be instances of very old maps. The good news is that most forms of structure do not move all that much over the years unless there is a very big storm or hurricane that comes through. So just keep that in mind when looking at the maps… fixed forms of structure like docks, rock jetties, etc. will likely be unmoved over the years. But less solid forms of structure like sand bars and sand points that are exposed to open water are very likely to change/move over a fairly short time, so don’t rely on the maps as heavily on the less solid forms of structure as you do the others and you shouldn’t run into too many surprises.

Charles McNally
Member

I’ve heard a lot about changing out the trebled for singles on some hard baits. But I’m not finding anything on choosing the right hooks to use. I could use a little help with that. Thanks
C.R.

Luke Simonds
Admin

There is a treble hook to single hook size chart on this article: https://www.saltstrong.com/articles/how-to-replace-treble-hooks/

Charles McNally
Member

Thank you!

William Hawkins
Member

Hello. I always enjoy reading your post and tips. I can honestly say that information acquired through becoming a Salt Strong member has made me a better fisherman.
I live and fish in the Jacksonville area, mostly in the ICW and smaller creeks. I have a small boat and am often intimidated by the St Johns river and the very strong currents. That being said, I am always intrigued by all the numerous large structures (bridges, docks, rocks and jetties) and deeper waters from the mouth of the river and inland several miles. I have trip planned and fished these areas many times, targeting Drum, Sheepshead and Trout with limited success. Same for Flounder. I do have several friends who target Flounder in these areas seasonally with success.
My primary questions for you would be with regard to CURRENT. How much current is too much current? The water can move really fast and powerful in some places. Also, sometimes it seems the current near the bottom is moving in a different direction than the surface. Will fish hold in these high current areas? How can I get my baits to sink and stay where I want them? How can I get my baits to move or drift into the position I want?
I would love to see a post on your site that deals specifically with CURRENT and also fishing large, deep industrial river locations like the St. Johns River.
Thank you for making me Salt Strong

Luke Simonds
Admin

Yes, fish will absolutely be holding in the high current zones. But as it gets stronger and stronger, it becomes much more difficult to fish so it’s often smart to target those areas on both ends of the turn when the water is not moving quite as fast.

As for getting your baits at the right spot at the right time, there isn’t really a one size fits all answer because it depends on water depth, current speed, wind speed/direction, etc. But overall, two factors that enable better control of your bait positioning in heavy current are by having more weight and/or by using line with less water drag (aka – thinner line).

I’ll make a point to film an inshore bottom fishing trip in a spot with heavy current soon.

Jeff Simmons
Member

That’s a “B” red fish, Morse code -…

Luke Simonds
Admin

Haha!

Cary Perkins
Guest
Cary Perkins

Glad you asked for comments. Been thinking about emailing you. Just got your live bait book last week. It’s great and it brought two questions to mind.

First…how do you hook fiddler crabs?Didn’t see it in the book.

And second, have you any experience with putting a spoon or jig on the end of a Sabiki rig and casting it for game fish? Is that something that might work?

I love your website and information. You guys are great!! Just wish I didn’t live in Kentucky where I could take more advantage of it.

Luke Simonds
Admin

Hey Cary, here’s a post showing how to catch and rig fiddler crabs: https://www.saltstrong.com/fishing-tip/how-to-catch-fiddler-crabs/

I have not tried putting a spoon or jig on the end of a sabiki rig, but it technically would work for both getting the sabiki hooks down into the strike zone while also having a chance of hooking something bigger. But I would recommend just having a spoon or jig rigged by itself on another rod because unhooking any bigger fish caught on the end of a sabiki could get a bit dangerous if there are a series of sabiki hooks going up the line.

Cary Perkins
Guest
Cary Perkins

Thanks, Luke! One other question. A lot of fish are toothy. Under what conditions or do you ever use steel leader?

Luke Simonds
Admin

I use wire when I’m targeting fish that are likely to slice through a mono/fluoro leader or when I’m getting broken off some unknown fish a couple times in a row.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

If you only had three lures to fish with , what would they be?

Luke Simonds
Admin

1. Weedless gold spoon
2. Soft plastic paddletail rigged on a 1/4th oz jig head
3. Bucktail jig

Richard Fiorentino
Member

I’m surprised there isn’t the Gulp Shrimp on this lost

Luke Simonds
Admin

The gulp shrimp is more of a situational lure choice.

Richard Fiorentino
Member

When do you use a bucktail jig?